Matina Jewell

Leadership in Action

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CR/Live: Resilience, Mental Health and the Story of Sweden

There’s been some big news headlines over the last 24 hours Ballarat City Council in regional Victoria have announced their interim CEO as Janet door and we’ll be coming to that topic in a few moments time on CR live because there’s some really exciting stuff happening there but before we go to that I’d like to introduce our first guest she is one of the world’s most known speakers when it comes to resilience she joined the military at 17 years old she’s a woman that I’ve met some time ago and to look at her you wouldn’t naturally place her in the military I think it’s fair to say but she has an incredible story to tell around resilience and today is very much about small business resilience and also the psychology that sits behind that we’re going to dig into that over the next hour for you all but a big huge welcome to mattina jewel CR live welcome matina having me great to be here not at all and just tell us a little bit about your career that started at 17 and how you ended up joining the military and then how now you’ve become this incredible world-class speaker talking about resilience well thanks Chris I guess yeah as you say it was an unusual path for me to join the army I grew up in the Byron Bay region and it wasn’t a natural progression for most students to go off to the military let alone women so it it kind of that whereas I’ve played a lot of sport I represented Australia in a few sports and I’ve toured China when I was 16 playing volleyball and I guess I come home to Australia and send out a number of things that I wanted to do in my career and heading overseas working with disadvantaged communities I guess I’d taken for granted up and left quite my Opry in my lifetime in Australia and also wanted to be a leader of teens hmm and so you know I only said all these things and I wanted to do my university study.

I wanted a former scholarship and much to my parents dismay when when I accepted this trained Defence Force Academy scholarship at Canberra to do my university studies and military training and yeah so I said head off when I was 17 but you know three years of university studies a full gear of um army offs and military training and then you spent fifteen years serving as an officer in the Australian Army and during that time I said on five overseas missions including representing Australia with the United Nations as a peacekeeper yeah unarmed s keeper in Syria and Lebanon I’m sure probably unpack a little bit more of that story but it turns about getting to keynote speaking and that was really by accident unfortunately my my military career was cut short due to injury on the

battlefield during the Lebanon War and

so until I was discharged from the

military I found myself I was I was

asked to write a book was fairly extreme

circumstances that I was injured during

that war but I guess it coincide with

the book the Australian sir I did a

two-part special documentary on me and

then more amorous thing else to speak in

events at the supermoon for that sort of

corporate leadership aspect of how we

build that resilience in people to

survive through those uncertain changing

and challenging times and you know and I

absolutely love speaking to audiences

all around the world across industries

and I’m you know I’m very fortunate to

found another career that I love just as

much as I did in the military and I’ve

loved chatting with you mattina

about your military career in the Middle

East I grew up in the Middle East I was

born out there I have this weird

affiliation and connection back to that

part of the world and I’ve certainly

lived through some of the chaos there I

lived there as a child during the Gulf

War when Scud missiles were coming over

our house and then we had gas masks that

we’d have to put on when the air-raid

sirens were now but that is nothing

compared to what you fronted up and had

to face I mean you’ve even you were

telling me the other day

put yourself in you’re scared of heights

and you’d even put yourself in a

situation where you threw yourself out

of the back of a plane

whilst being scared of heights and with

minimal equipment and just walk us

through

why you did that and some of the real

tense environments that you’ve been and

put into and had to deal with in your

career in the military yeah like you

know the military is fantastic it

throwing people in the deep end instead

of putting them outside of their comfort

zones and into things that they wouldn’t

naturally choose to participate in and

so that the fast-roping that you’re

talking about and must correct just

wasn’t out of a plan it’s actually out

of a helicopter although I have the

parachutes in the army as well to the

ground but still substantial high sent

after September 11th I was serving over

in the Middle East and I was actually

working with the American Navy SEALs and

the became a requirement where I was

needed to be able to fast rope and and

actually say fast roping is normally uh

never done in our Australian Army by US

Special Forces soldiers and that’s

because there’s a huge safety factor

consider with this particular activity

in that you are literally 30 60 feet

above the ground or in my case a moving

target will boarding smuggler ships in

the North Arabian Gulf and you’re

literally getting out of the helicopter

just using a rope so this there’s not

even a rappelling harness there’s no

great big safety net that’s gonna break

your fall if you decide to stuff this

one up um you literally just have your

hands and your feet on the rope and you

squeeze the rope and that sort of

controls your very very rapid descent

down to the ground so there’s a special

technique you do but you know in this

situation you know wearing body armor

we’ve got weapons hanging off us on

boarding smugglers ships and for me

having these special waivers signed off

by the chief of the Defence Force at the

time to allow me as an officer if

there’s a female officer to do that when

it’s normally any special forces was

something that you know I didn’t expect

to ever be asked to do that during my

career and the biggest problem was not

only that physical capability like I had

to have that strength and the endurance

to hold myself on the rope but more

important this as you said it was a

mental challenge because I’m terrified

of heights and finding myself as a

leader in this situation where I had a

very genuine fear but also needing to

lead my team and reassure them what

we’re doing we’re going to be as safe as

we possibly could in what is you know a

rather high risk environment it’s crazy

to think of that world that you were in

there and the world now that we’re in

today and this is kind of them when I

want to draw this connect between these

two environments dealing with adversity

dealing with absolute chaos and there’s

no way other way of describing this

world that we’re in or Co that 19

including the chaos we were dealing with

in the control room 15 minutes ago I

mean this just seems now to be

continuous its ongoing its relentless

and it just keeps pushing and pushing

how do you think what you’ve been

through

previously applies to be able to help

you today and does it I mean is there a

connect there is that is there something

that you’ve gone you know what I can do

this and I can help others and and

there’s a lesson there yeah absolutely I

think it’s all those underlying

principles the only unpack you know

regardless of the environment obviously

the situation’s I was serving in across

my 15 year career were these you know

very extreme life-threatening literally

life-threatening situations where were

you know we’re under attack from fighter

jets bombs exploding around us and

having to make decisions literally life

and death and as a leader as an officer

making those decisions that I knew would

not only impact on my life but would

directly impact the lives of the

soldiers that I was commanding in those

environments so there was a whole

responsibility process as hatched to

that risk and decision-making process

but you know it’s unpacking all of those

underlying principles that are directly

applicable regardless of whether it’s on

the battlefield in the boardroom or even

at home in your own personal life and I

guess it’s those principles I like

sharing with my audiences around the

world of how to help them find that

resilience and not only build it for

themselves but for their teams their

entire businesses

through those difficult challenging

times that you know we’re all now

experiencing in covert 19 do you think

we took we treat you now chat about this

recently Maddie the there’s a an acronym

that sometimes almost gets overused and

it’s PTSD and I think we’re in an era

now where we are potentially going to

see some massive challenges when it

comes to mental health and certainly

you’ve gone through PTSD at points in

your career there you were telling me

about how do you when you look at the

military background you’ve got you’ve

gone through over the years how has the

military dealt with mental health

challenges and PTSD and what have they

got wrong honestly and where they

started to improve because I think

you’ve also had a role in this since

your military career as well haven’t you

yeah that’s fun Chris I think because of

the environments that we place our

people that and obviously you know quite

young people that we put extraordinary

responsibilities on the shoulders of our

young people serving in our Defence

Force and they do a magnificent job in

very chaotic high-pressure situations

around the world and unfortunately as

part of our service and for me

personally you know I’ve experienced and

seen and witnessed things on the

battlefield

you know horrific incidences that you

can’t just erase from your memory that

you need to unpack those experiences

because that would be part of you and

they’ll make you who you are today and

in the future and I think you know the

military has learned over time that we

do need to address these issues that it

doesn’t help to say no stiff-upper-lip

let’s crack on to the next thing and try

and forget about or numb the experiences

we’ve had and so the military actually

you know even during my career there was

great changes and steps forward to

improve the way that we address mental

health one of the biggest problems for

the military as well as general

population is actually removing the

stigma associated with mental health and

in particular PTSD and I think you know

it’s part of the process is getting that

help early trying to remove the stigma

but that’s part of a cultural change and

and as we all know cultural changes

really do take

I’m and persistence you know the people

to push the the culture that you want

into place and great leadership to do

that but the military over time has made

mental health is now free for all

serving personnel and also any of our

veterans previous serving people they

can access free mental health and you

know we actually go through a process

when we come back from the war zones

around the world any deployments we send

our people on we do what we now call

decompression training which is all you

know psychological decompressing from

those high stress environments that

we’ve been in being able to use the

camaraderie and the support that we have

around us in those teams before we send

our personnel back to the families and

leaving for the families to sort of

unpack I guess that was one of the

greatest learnings that the military has

made over time is that this is part of

that job and in therefore it’s a

responsibility of the Defense Force and

Veterans Affairs to to ensure how people

are looked after rather than rely on the

the family support to help people

through those you know really difficult

stages when they fit back from overseas

deployment and I think this is a

brilliant time now to bring in our

resident psychologist Sabina Reid Sabina

welcome as always on see our life great

to have you this is incredible to hear

just the depth of what mady’s talking

about there when it comes to PTSD the

bid I’m really interested in because I

mean there’s a heap of talk going on

around mental health and the challenges

that we’re going to face I’m also

interested in this almost the labeling

this PTSD component do you think that we

are going to have a challenge with

people that will have a post-traumatic

stress disorder post covert 19 is this

going to be something that we should be

kind of trying to look into the future

of and preparing and if that’s the case

what do we need to do I mean we’ve heard

some great stuff there from Maddie

around decompression training how the

military do what are the parallels there

for us

well we you’ve just thrown a few

questions my way crystal it’s just a few

steps around post-traumatic stress

disorder approximately 12% of Aussies

will experience

PTSD over their lifetime and 25% of

people who are exposed to some kind of

trauma like the kind that Mattie is

talking about but there’s so many other

kinds and as you say Koba 19 is bringing

those to the forefront for many people

25% of people who are exposed to some

kind of trauma will go on to develop

post-traumatic stress disorder so in

answer to your question we now have

perhaps we can assume a much higher

percentage of the Australian and global

population being exposed to various

traumas and serious and confronting

challenges and so if we think that 25

percent of them are going to convert

PTSD it’s very possible that we’re going

to see an increase in this condition in

our population in Australia and beyond

and I think that the question then is

with that recognized recognizing and

those those stats there I’m certainly

going to be chatting shortly to Kate

Carnell about the mental health

implications she was the CEO of

beyondblue she’s the small business

Ombudsman now as well what do we need to

be doing to to get ourselves in the best

place possible because let’s assume that

this is not going to be something just

this year around mental health it’s

going to be a topic this is going to be

2021 and 2022 how does business play a

role in this what role does government

play in this and where do we need to

take some learnings I’ve got so many

thoughts on this topic and it’s such a

big one I want to just reflect on one of

my favorite longitudinal studies of

resilience which is really one of the

things you and I and Maddie are talking

about now and it was a study that was

conducted in Hawaii on the Island of

Hawaii many years ago around 800 kids

were studied by a woman called Emmy

Werner and why I think this is such a

potent research is it studied these kids

for over three decades now this was a

very impoverished area there was low

socioeconomic status of these kids and

Families low education high unemployment

and she wanted to examine why did some

of these people come out the other end

as resilient thriving people and others

did not when they all started at its

relatively low baseline and a couple of

things I think we can take from the

study including that the kids that went

onto thrivers adults did a few things

that I think we can all do we can all do

as you say in as individuals in our

family units in our workplaces in

government and beyond one of the things

they did if they thought that challenges

we’re kind of going into the most remote

now that we thought the challenges

happened for them not to them that’s the

first thing that I think we can

obviously an unprecedented times and

challenges are pretty good and real what

can we do in order to respond to help us

grow and thrive it sounds kind of trite

but this is what the research has been

telling us for decades that we have to

listen the other thing that these kids

on the island of Kauai did is they found

what they called a charismatic adult but

what we would call a mentor or a support

or a guide or a leader or someone to

help us so with regards to mental health

that we’re talking about now we’re not

expected to do it alone we’re not all

mental health professionals and so

whether you’re running a team of

business a family or yourself with a

couple of canines in you know to boot

you don’t have to have all the answers

you need to be able to create a space

that’s safe enough for people to share

authentically what they’re dealing with

and then once you’ve been able to hear

those stories and those challenges then

we can start to find a way to respond

because there are so many wonderful rich

resources in Australia to us available

to help with mental health so you don’t

need to have all the answers but don’t

stick your head in the sand and do

nothing

Madi I can see you nodding away there

too what Sabinas saying what’s your your

thoughts on the resources available and

anything else with this yeah I think you

know there are so many resources out

there for people blue on blue for

example just one that people can go and

reach out to most industries have their

own support as well so you know for me I

think it’s about getting some support

early talking about it I think what the

military has been guilty of previously

has been trying to sort of just just to

bunker down and not talk about the

things that have you know cause people

concern and keeping them awake at night

and I think the best thing we can do is

open the lid on

have those conversations with supportive

people people get the professional help

in early you know if it is something

that is continuing to bother you so you

can get on the front foot of it and I

said you know for me personally it’s

those challenging environments that have

actually been the biggest learning

opportunities for me so if you go back

to fast roping out of helicopter sort of

facing my fear being on the battlefield

under fire you know even losing my

teammates in the Lebanon War and being

injured myself and losing my career as

horrific and horrible that period was

where I really hit rock bottom coming

home and then also having to fight the

government for more service recognition

and health cover all those periods oh

now we with distance some time to look

back on them yeah those are the moments

that are really defined me and shaped my

character into a stronger person so I

think some of it is also perspective and

I also you know often talk about purpose

in these environments when were in that

really dark period the one thing that

got me out of bed and I had fractured

and crushed five vertebrae when I was

thrown into the bulletproof windscreen

of my armored vehicle during the war and

a number of other internal injuries so

that’s what sort of led to to the end of

my military career you know I was in a

spinal brace for for about a year and

the one thing that kind of got me to

turn around from those dark depressive

days was actually doing something for

somebody else and my husband’s a

marketing a corporate marketing

executive and this one particular day I

decided I’d get up and actually I’m him

the business ship before he went off to

work you know that was a fast stretch

from you know commanding soldiers and

operations overseas and all the things

that I’ve done in my career up into that

point being a Navy diver and all sorts

of things that I had considered as hard

work but that was my challenge for the

day and I just set these little steps

that I could build on each day and also

get a sense of achievement from that you

know I died in my shirt I felt like I’d

actually done something that helps

somebody else so I think you know often

when I’m working with clients wanting to

build that resilience after they’ve gone

through a traumatic experience is

actually helping them just find some

small step forward sometimes the whole

picture looks insurmountable but if we

can break it down

one small thing each day that we can

build on we can sort of find our way

through and come out the other side and

what a beautiful way to finish off that

but the last question goes to use Sabina

as always last question here have a

think about what is it that if you’re a

small business owner now you’re looking

into this little team you’ve got you’re

trying to work out how to just even get

from one day to the next what’s the

final thought that you would leave for

them around how to deal with the

enormity of what’s going on how they can

just make those steps forwards so first

of all I think it’s not let’s look at

the enormity of what’s going on let’s

break it down into bite-sized chunks

which Mattie’s alluded to as well and if

I’m managing a team or a business and

I’m particularly thinking about the

mental health of the people that work

for me and with me

my number one takeaway there is to

really look at observable tangible

changes from the way these people may

have once behaved or expressed

themselves to how they are now because

if you notice that someone who was

always punctual is now not punctual or

someone who was always chatty is now

very withdrawn some though if those

observable changes in behavior that we

need to be really aware of and it’s a

really good place to start a

conversation with the people that work

with us and for us without feeling like

you’re diagnosing or attacking or

criticizing or snooping because I think

so many people who run and work in

businesses and teens as leaders think

it’s not my business I don’t know how to

start this conversation so I’ll just put

my head down and I hope that it kind of

moves along that’s not going to happen

but if we’re able to start a

conversation with hey I kind of noticed

that you know you’re not turning up

punch lis obviously tirzu meetings

because we’re not having face-to-face

meetings at the moment but you know some

kind of observable behavior change

that’s a really good place to start the

conversation you know is that what it’s

like for you if I got that right how you

traveling that’s the beginning point as

a manager or leader or a business owner

thanks very much Savino great to chat to

you as always about the psychological

trends that we’re seeing and also the

impact for small business our next guest

is an incredible powerhouse where

our future here in Australia and a

massive advocate for small business

she is the small business Ombudsman here

the inaugural one in fact for Australia

it is of course Kate Carnell Kate

welcome to see our live this afternoon

hi Chris I’m look there’s no doubt at

all that you are incredibly busy in your

role as the small business Ombudsman at

the moment championing the cause for a

small business here in Australia these

are pretty tough times for any small

business owner what are the big

challenges that you see in your role

that we probably need to be a bit more

aware of that we aren’t at the moment

look Chris I think some of the things

people forget is there’s 2.3 million

small businesses in Australia that’s

trading small businesses and they employ

half the workforce so they’re incredibly

important but you know through this

covered

pandemic this crisis it’s small

businesses that have borne the brunt of

the problem because let’s be fair it’s

industries like restaurants retail the

arts events you know I could go through

them that have been that have had all

sorts of issues like having to close

down literally overnight now for those

businesses there they’re struggling you

know most small businesses have between

21 and 28 days worth of capital I don’t

have much if revenue dries up overnight

you can’t keep the business afloat for

very long so things like job keeper of

being really important but I tell you

what the biggest issue for them right

now is cashflow and focusing on what

life looks like post covert because I

tell you why any business who thinks

it’s the same you know we can just go

back to what it was like is kidding

themselves and I think the fact you and

I are talking together as we are right

now just tells you you know the world’s

changed and business has to change with

it it does and I think despite and in

spite of all of

the the horrific situations that we’ve

seen come out of this I mean Australia

kate is doing pretty well globally if I

look at how we’ve dealt with this and

regardless of anyone’s political

persuasions here put those all to one

side and we’ve got a government here

that I in my absolute view and believe

genuinely are doing absolutely right by

Australia and let’s be honest this is a

situation that nobody could have planned

for nobody would want to lead a country

through my absolute chaos and in fact

you I believe if I remember rightly I’m

searching through my memory banks here

but you were once the Chief Minister for

the a CT so you have really been in

government and some very senior

positions what do you think going ahead

beyond covert now that government really

needs to keep laser focused on for small

business what’s the big-ticket item so

they have to keep that on well first and

foremost let’s hope one of the things

that happens off the back of this is the

government keeps the national cabinet

together

that’s that entity of the prime the

prime minister the the Premier’s the

Chief Minister’s getting together

regularly to set direction for the

nation both its state and federal level

now you know the problem with it with a

federation is we’ve had a bit of a

breakdown between our state’s and

federal government with our different

rules in every States we don’t even have

a standard national transport rule

approach so if you drive a truck from

Perth to Brisbane you’ve got different

rules for loading different rules for

all sorts of things the whole way

through so some of the challenges is

getting rid of the unnecessary red tape

the things that get in the way of

productivity and I believe that can be

done by keeping national cabinet

together so that the state’s ended and

the territories will work together with

a focus hopefully a laser focus on

productivity but for the federal

government the major issues at the

moment allowing small businesses to get

on with the job of employing and growing

so

rid of unnecessary red tape unnecessary

regulations making it easier to employ

so we need to fix our tax system I think

we can get rid of things like fringe

benefit tax get rid of have instant

asset write-off get rid of depreciation

and in industrial relations we just need

to get rid of the system that’s got the

Fair Work Act spot 960 sections quarter

of a million words and then we’ve got

122 Awards as well small businesses have

got no show to get that system right and

we’ve got to come up with a system that

allows our 2.3 million small businesses

our capacity to employ more people I’m

gonna go out on a limb here Kate and I’m

gonna make you the new prime minister

for Australia today so your first job if

you were Prime Minister what would you

be doing in this situation here so you

know you ask me the first job you know a

chunk of the things I’ve just said are

doable and you know I’d do them but my

first job would be to say okay we’re

going to purchase we’re going to use our

really significant purchasing power and

we’re going to purchase the significant

amounts of goods and services that the

federal government purchases every year

and we’re going to purchase them from

Australian companies with a particular

focus on SMEs now we haven’t done that

in the past because of World Trade

organisation’s free trade open borders

all of that’s really fine except right

now we need to focus on getting the

Australian economy flying and we and

what small businesses tell me is they

won’t work they don’t want grants I mean

they’ll put it you know grants are fine

to keep them afloat but they want

business and we’re not just talking

about what we call it the sandwich and

paperclip procurement we’re talking

about IT construction a whole range of

things but we’ve got businesses in this

country that can do this work we don’t

need to rely on multinational or

purchasing offshore

and I think look I’ve been having heaps

of conversations Kate with everyone from

established businesses like Hanes paint

I was there with them on they I was

there with the family talking about how

they’ve responded to this situation over

the last few weeks amazing story there

I’m off to see Brown Brothers next week

to meet the Brown family and talk to

them about what they’re doing with the

future but I think there’s been a real

absolute resounding support for we need

to be really laser focused again to use

that word on Australian business

supporting that to really kickstart our

economy but the thing that’s come out

that I’ve kind of been a little bit

surprised about is that there’s this

real desire to be very innovative around

manufacturing again and that doesn’t

mean bring back new car manufacturing or

the big old stuff but how can Australia

in your view be a real powerhouse when

it comes to innovative manufacturing for

our future here do you have a view on

that look absolutely and it’s been great

to hear the government Karen Andrews who

is the Minister for industry

particularly but also in the defence

space Melissa price talking about how we

can make manufacturing and particularly

high-tech manufacturing really fly in

Australia we’ve seen pretty small

businesses pivot to be able to produce

ventilators really quickly and other PPE

requirements it shows your Australian

businesses can do all sorts of really

innovative things if we give them the

capacity to do so and it was interesting

I’m involved in CDI C which is in the

defense industry space trying to get

more small businesses small to medium

businesses into the defence supply chain

and I was on of call this morning and

one of the manufacturers it’s on that

group I was saying you know it’s

interesting he’s he does all the work in

South Korea South Korea has 26 percent

of their their economy is in

manufacturing back in 1975 26 percent of

his Australian

was in a drug of the workforce was in

manufacturing as well so abet Linebaugh

with South Korea back then now we’re at

6% and they’re still at 26% and our

wages are very similar so it shows that

you know we have a look at other

countries that have managed to focus on

you know getting their innovative

manufacturers giving them the capacity

to grow we’ve got the people here we’ve

got the innovation here we’ve just got

to give them the capacity to grow their

products here we invent things we’ll but

then we don’t take it to the next phase

of actually manufacturing in Australia

and you know just using South Korea as

an example they have no natural

resources and we’ve got everything yeah

so you know we can do this we just have

to focus on making it happen do you

think we get enough support from the

community when it comes to supporting

local manufacturing I mean I’ve been out

there meeting with small business owners

from cafes the likes of like we just

talked about homes paint and I’ve been

up to Balor out to meet businesses out

there and see what they’re doing and one

message has come out there the supports

through koban 19 has just been

unfathomable I mean I’ve even had

emotional reactions where business

owners have cried in front of me on

camera ago I just couldn’t believe the

response we’ve had do you think I mean

across the country where we’re seeing

that and will that continue even after

covert 19 I’m Chris I’m on the board of

the Australian made campaign you know

the little triangle with the you know we

found at the Australian made campaign

that we have never seen anything like

this even in the middle of coal that

we’ve got huge numbers of new members

the interest in our website in a social

media space

you know we had 600 percent increases

Australians are saying they want to buy

Australian Australian goods Australian

services they understand to be reliant

on offshore procurement anymore

so they want it to be a balance we’ve

got to be able to stand on our own two

feet

so it’s trail Ian’s are saying

categorically as the people you were

talking to that you know this this is

actually a total change in attitude I

think in Australia we’ve been a bit

maybe fad and Happiness sort of you know

that we’ve sort of just gone with the

flow yeah and you know if you can get

cheap stuff from overseas that’s good

I think we’ve changed and let’s hope

that we all now embed this in the way we

operate my executive officer needed to

buy some new socks because cameras gonna

be cold

I mean took her eight shops before she

could actually find socks that were made

in Australia but she found them okay and

she found them they made from Brunei

will in Australia so if you make the

effort you can find Australian made and

they’re great products high quality

great price you might pay em might pay a

bit more but hey it’s worth it

absolutely I’m one of my big passion

projects is convincing and making sure

my mother-in-law follows that same

trajectory there when she’s out she’s

not just buying the cheap tin tomatoes

and she’s looking for the ones with the

Australian labor long because that’s

that’s critical to fusion everyone needs

to be doing that and I think there’s

never been a time where our communities

and societies are behind this now and

the challenge for all of us is to make

sure we continue that through

Australians do incredibly well the last

thing I want to leave with you on Kate

is you were a one-time also the CEO for

beyondblue

here in Australia mental health is going

to be an enormous topic for us going

into the rest of this year and also the

year after

what do you see some of the things that

we perhaps aren’t as focused on in that

area and we need to be very careful on

um Chris if you have a think about you

know small business generally for a

while

those 2.3 million I was talking about

earlier um in January or late last year

I mean there’s certainly businesses that

were badly affected by the bush fire so

had a bad December January but for most

businesses they have planned even those

affected by brush fires they were

you know we’ll get through this and you

know that we know what we’re gonna do

from here so they went from having a

plan knowing where they were going know

what their business looks like to being

closed or almost closed overnight or

having no customers overnight as you

said earlier no one could have planned

for this this is a level of stress that

you know no no normal person could could

deal with and remember for lots of small

businesses their houses the security on

their business loan so if the business

falls over there is a fairly good chance

they’ll lose their houses as well their

home you know I know buddy is Superman

or superwoman and I think the message

for small businesses or other people who

have lost their job who never imagined

they’d be anywhere near central in their

lives and all of a sudden are having to

you know navigate that system is to

understand that one in four Australians

experience mental health situations at

some point in their lives in the best of

times and this is not the best of times

there’s a website that my office has put

together because there’s a bit of a

passion for me called my business health

so people Google my business health

you’ll get a website associated to the

strain small business and family

Enterprise Ombudsman site and what we’ve

tried to do there is help small

businesses with tools that help them

with with cash flow with the grants that

are available from levels of government

all that stuff but also what you can do

to look after yourself getting through

coded is going to be tough but I tell

you what if you don’t look after your

own mental health and that of your

family and make sure you know you keep

an eye on your staff as well then it’s

going to be very hard for your

businesses to survive and for your

family to survive as well and we need

that to happen so except you’re not

Superman or superwoman you need to look

after your own mental health and there

is significant support available to do

that my business health it’s got some

great places to go beyond blue as it’s

ready

4:7 helpline where you’ll speak to a

mental health support person if you

wanted if you can if you want to do that

go on to the beyondblue website or my

business health and accept that you have

a responsibility to look after your own

mental health otherwise you can’t look

after others or your business kate

Carnell small business ombudsman thank

you so much for your time it’s always

great chatting with you

I always thoroughly enjoy our

conversations have a great rest we can

thank you again also for all the work

that you’re doing for small business

across Australia thanks Chris and it’s

always fun to talk to you too take care

thanks very much Kate great to chat to

you and thanks for your time on see our

live this afternoon and now on to our

next guest a very good friend of mine

fellow futurist a Globetrotter and all

he is also Swedish but don’t hold that

against him Anders Soren Nilsson welcome

to see our live this afternoon great to

be here creating the future with you

today I Chris and look it’s it’s

interesting isn’t it I mean you are also

so you’re Swedish Australian you spend

your your life with your beautiful

little family split between those two

parts of the world and Sweden keeps

hitting the headlines at the moment when

it comes to kovat 19 and some of the the

numbers and the stats and let’s face it

you and I as futurists are always about

trends and patterns and stats and Sweden

isn’t hitting the note for all the good

reasons in my view and we were chatting

about this yesterday yeah absolutely and

I think you know one of the things

that’s become very very clear is that

you know this Swedish kind of approach

of what we culturally term log on which

is an old Viking saying in fact it came

from the use of beer around the table

and the good old Viking days if you just

drank enough beer and then passed it on

to your mate and it lasted around the

table there was a log on or around the

team

the Swedish approach to most things

tends to be very sort of balanced and

even and not extreme in any way and

they’re trying to tread

a very careful sort of middle path where

things are not really closed but they’re

also not really open at the moment and

that is a huge challenge for the

population and and for businesses and

happen but really in Anders how success

I mean you’ve got a really good position

on this because apart from having your

parents still over there in Sweden their

businesses which we’ll come back to in a

second I mean how successful have you

really seen this going for for them

because I’d be honest I I don’t I don’t

see how this has been going particularly

well for Sweden so far well I’m part of

the Swedish diaspora that doesn’t live

in Sweden anymore I mean I certainly

visit there and spend a lot of time over

there at least pre quarantine and pre

covered but it hasn’t been successful at

all and and sadly many Swedes still have

their heads in the sand and very much

just following government guidelines

which hasn’t really you know led to any

real results

I mean Sweden is still at the top of

many of the tables of the worst way of

managing covered their results are still

you know in the exponential sort of knee

of the curve or beyond the knee of the

curve examples of deaths and infections

their way of testing and tracing has

also been very very controversial and at

the same time as they’re sort of saying

that they want to keep livelihoods alive

businesses alive they’re doing very very

little to actually back that from from a

government support perspective

whereas we in Australia can be I think

very very proud in terms of what the

government has been offering to small

businesses and large businesses alike so

Sweden is failing to protect both lives

and livelihoods for many many days in

the last fortnight

Sweden’s been at the top of the table of

deaths per capita which is very very

worrying and of course when when the

data is there as you point out as

futurists we can be human centric and

strategy centric because we’re also very

very data-centric and the Swedish

government and the health Institute has

been failing to

the switch strategy when the evidence is

clearly against the fact that it’s not

working now they’re telling us to take a

more long-term long-range

view of this and saying that maybe when

the second wave hits in other countries

around the world well that’s when the

jury truly comes back in but in the

meantime the Swedish story is is not

looking good and and as you and I are

always looking for trends that kind of

show is where we’re going to be going

over the next few years I think it’s

safe to say that we’re all in this phase

now where we’re trying to look at

they’re very much the immediacy of

what’s going on and what even the next

few months look like with the let’s be

honest the the slightly disastrous

approach to what we’re seeing with

Sweden there what’s the impact being

from that on a business level have we

seen businesses and the economy being

impacted because if you believe

everything you read in the media you

would think that everything’s going as

normal and business is great and

everyone’s moving about their daily

lives and Sweden is normal is that a

reality or are we is there something

different going on no that’s that’s not

the reality I was interviewed on in Wall

Street Journal just the other week about

this and and sadly about the very you

know business case is very close to my

you know enduring the analog emotional

heart and it’s you know it’s the sad

tale of my parents hundred four year old

third generation menswear retail store

going under and going into voluntary

administration as a result of all of the

uncertainty so what do you see in in

most newspapers or in the media at least

you were in the initial stages of Sweden

sort of revolutionary approach was you

know young people out drinking beers and

the in the spring sunshine but the store

that wasn’t being told is that anybody

over 60 really was just taking matters

into their own hands and staying at home

and for my parents that was disastrous

because the major part of their customer

demographic is a baby boomer and so

those people were already quarantined

without being forced into quarantine

which meant that you know any business

that sort of skewed towards baby boomers

I had a really really rough time so the

story is really that you know neither

livelihoods or lives are being saved at

the moment and if you compare it with

the Australian approach of you know of

grants of pay keeper of investment or

you know focus on construction of you

know help with basses etc for you know

for all types of businesses you know we

are far ahead of where Sweden is and

even the economic indicators are such

that you know compared to other

Scandinavian countries that did have

firm lockdown

Sweden’s GDP decrease will be in line

with those and in terms of unemployment

again unemployment will be the same as

the rest of the eurozone so it is it is

troublesome and of course when it comes

to Sweden’s tourism season this summer

it’s also going to be impacted because

it’s now on the list the only country on

a list of tourists from Germany where

you have to sit in quarantine for a week

after returning from a Swedish holiday

if you dare go there yeah I look and you

know I’ve been chatting about this

yesterday and Sweden is going to

continue to be a big topic when we’re

looking at countries and how they’ve

been responding to covert 19 I think

there’s no doubt at all at this side of

the world Australia so far at least and

New Zealand as well have have certainly

been leading and the pack and let’s hope

that continues we’ve also seen though

over the last week or so

the chief health officer from Sweden

acknowledged at least in part that if

he’d had the time again to do this there

are things that he would have done

differently what do you think if we look

at the bigger picture Sweden and Europe

what do you think we’re going to see

them do now differently if we had to try

and make some predictions and I realize

that’s a cruel question to us to any

food maker pre-action with what’s going

on but I am I guess

I get to be the Futurist than they and

the hobby hobby epidemiologist at the

same time you know it’s really hard to

tell I mean I do think that you know the

people responsible for this in Sweden

have got us to step up and take

responsibility I would like to see the

person understand ill as his name is

resign and and and own the failure that

this strategy has entailed at the moment

there’s been no talk of that and also

would like to see you know sways really

taking taking this up and voting with

their feet in the next election because

also the social democratic government

has been following religiously the

advice from someone who’s been you know

responsible for for many many many

deaths that could have been prevented

and so that’s my firm view

I mean Britain did change tack they were

following a similar strategy to what

Sweden has been deploying in in a more

flexible more agile manner now you know

things have been fairly disastrous in

the UK as well but when they saw the

data at least they changed tack and we

haven’t seen that from Sweden quite yet

but again you know if we the proof might

be in the pudding the jury is still out

we’re gonna see what happens in

countries that are now starting to

suffer from from a second wave like you

know South Korea Iran etc as as the

world opens up that is that is still an

unknown but you know certainly happy to

at the moment call Australia home living

on an island has never been better and

you see similar results in Iceland and

New Zealand for example you know being

in Ireland in this particular instance

even though we’re all digitally

interconnected these days being on an

analogue island suddenly helps from that

from stopping stopping viruses I think

there’s there’s also no doubt at all

that England did change strategy exactly

as you said I’m the question I’ve always

had was Sweden didn’t really seem to

have one and I think I don’t want to

continue on with Sweden too much because

there’s lots of other stuff for us to

talk about but the other one I want to

talk is you and I are plumbed into all

sorts of businesses all year

long we’re always trying to again

explore the patterns that are going on

and I think there’s one resounding theme

that’s coming out again and again for me

and for you over the last few months

which is businesses are now very much

accelerating their digital and

technology plans much quicker than they

were in necessarily intending on doing I

had a chat with the founders of

Australia’s biggest paint company Hames

paint the other week and they were

telling me exactly this that they were

accelerating their digital strategy

they’ve been very much an offline

business they’re now suddenly pulled

everything very much quickly to go into

this new online world what kind of

patterns are you seeing there as well

understand that and how do you think

that’s going to play out for us as

futurists for the rest of this year and

also for our clients well there’s a

couple of things here you know such an

adela from Microsoft and they’re one of

our clients he said recently that really

because of colvett 20 not covered 90 my

apologies what you’ve seen is really you

know the the compression of two years

worth of digital transformation in two

months but I would hazard a guess and

actually say that it’s a decade’s worth

of change of leadership challenges of

digital disruption and digital

transformation that has been yes

converge but into a single year and that

year is 2020 now some people want to

cancel 2020 I don’t think that that’s

the right way to go about things but I

do think is a great way for us at the

moment to unlearn relearn and learn some

new stuff about our businesses be those

big or small and I just alluded before

to the case of my parents menswear store

in Stockholm Sweden I’ve grown up with

retail so retailers really you know in

my blood and my mum has been my toughest

she’s been my toughest pro bono client

for many many years and we were driving

very much you know a digital

transformation strategy for her really

from the early days of when digital

disruption started hitting us you know

10 15 years ago and

I think that digital disruption and in

many ways was a sort of a future signal

to all of us that it was time to wake up

there was a dress rehearsal in many ways

for what was to come and covered 19 has

been the burning platform for

transformation and you know and I know

that as futurists or a science fiction

storytellers you know that it can be

really really difficult to sell change

and really lead people into a place in

the future through great strategy where

people really buy into that with hearts

and minds and now we really have the

burning platform for that change and so

there’s a couple of reports we’ve just

released one together with Microsoft on

the future of artificial intelligence in

retail and how a I can in fact help with

retail brazilians and another report

from ing that we just co-authored the

other month as well which is called

future focus which really focuses on the

future of jobs and I think this is that

heartening part of this it’s that

technology is stepping up to actually

provide hope for humanity and for us to

flip our cognitive thinking to retool to

upskill and find the jobs that are

emerging and what I term the second

Renaissance pandemics have a history of

leading to you know workforce mobility

and labor shifts and even investments in

technology and this is what we’re seeing

right now and if you’re not on your toes

and learning and unlearning and

relearning a few things this year you’ve

really missed an opportunity it is it is

sad to hear obviously about your your

family story there that of your business

because I know that’s been a big part of

your narrative that you use even in your

keynotes which you you talk this story

about analog to digital it was a big

part in your books as well I’m sure

something extraordinary won’t come out

of it I mean through all of these chaos

at times we see some great things come

out and I have no doubt the same will

apply there for you I want you to leave

us with one final thought and as I

normally ask this question when I’m

interviewing clients because I

some really great answers I if you have

one hope for the future post pandemic

when we come out of whatever this is and

whatever the end looks like let’s let’s

assume Wilson will know what the end is

when we get there when we’re into this

new beginning this new era post covert

19 what’s your hope for the future well

my hope for the future is really that

we’re going to see a creative

Renaissance a second Renaissance or the

flourishing of human innovation and

creativity pre covered we all had to do

really menial stars of work even at the

top echelon of the banking world you

know top bankers would be spending up to

30% of their day doing data entry for

example menial stars are work that

really we should be outsourcing to

robots I do believe that with covert

while we’ve been hibernating machines

have kept learning and I do believe that

by actually outsourcing more and more of

the cognitive grunt work data entry

pattern recognition crunching the

numbers etc punching Excel spreadsheets

right a lot of these menial work will be

done by robots so that humans again can

focus on the meaningful tapping into

more of our right brain our

interpersonal skills our entrepreneurial

skills to really create the workforce

and the styles of jobs that we want not

just for this generation but for future

generations so that people can actually

feel the freedom and the Liberty to tap

into their own creative genius because I

do think that that creative genius times

AI is what’s going to position

individuals well for the future

thanks very much Islanders great to chat

to you as always and all the best to

your family over that back in Sweden and

now onto our big news story of the day

last night the new interim CEO just got

announced for Ballarat City Council as

Janet two-door council just voted her in

and she actually starts in her new role

tomorrow as the CEO of Ballarat City

Council and the previous CEO Justin

Lindley got fired after a damning

ombudsman report so Janet’s coming back

in very much to shake things up

and interestingly as it happens I drove

up to Ballarat with my crew a few weeks

ago to have a chat with Janet about how

she sees the future of not just local

government but also business in regional

Australia janet has been the CEO of

Ballarat City Council before she’s also

been the CEO of Newcastle City Council

she’s been the CEO the TAC here in

Australia and also she sat on various

boards including for central highlands

water she’s a powerhouse when it comes

to business and government she’s got a

very strong idea of what the future

looks like take a look at this small

segment from our interview that we had

with Janet just a few weeks ago what

role does local government play in

helping a community maintain stability

and then ultimately grow out of the back

of that there has to be a real rejigging

of the way local government operates so

that the community feels confident

business can feel confident and things

are put in place so that people get

answers quickly people talk about red

and green tape and brown tape which is

the heritage restrictions in some ways

we’ve got to really go back to common

sense and get some things happening

we’ll be releasing some more of that

interview over the next few days it

truly is incredibly insightful and to

see how Janet sees the future for local

government and the interesting thing is

I’ll also be going up there in a few

weeks time to have a chat with her again

to see how things are going once she’s

settled back into our role as this CEO

and now on to our next guest

Gavin read drop our usual tech

commentator but he’s here to talk all

things business with us today

hi guys welcome to the see our live show

thanks Chris it’s great to be here and

massive congratulations to Janet

well-deserved position absolutely she’s

an amazing woman

and I’ve known her for quite a few years

and I’ve actually been up with you in

your business there over the last few

weeks because as well as being a tech

expert which you’re frequently on here

chatting with us about you are also a

retail small business owner so you’re

very much at the front line of how

things are going on they’re in balance

and it has been a little bit of chaos in

trying to open your doors of your

business recently just walk us through

what’s been going on yeah absolutely so

we’ve got a couple of retail businesses

here in Bel Air and I think I’m the

biggest challenge has been getting lined

up with the new rules and regulations

across state government and federal

government and also the councils they’ve

sort of all released different

information packages and different

announcements so all sort of being quite

difficult to line that up but one of the

great things is that with sort of you

know lucky enough to connect with other

business owners in in Ballarat as well

as what were previously competitors as

well to be able to really communicate

those understanding of those rules and

regulations across across the industry

as a whole and try and come up with the

best practices by accumulating the

information together and working out

what’s going to be best for the safety

they are customers and staff this is

interesting is it because you and I were

chatting about this earlier Gavin around

how you’ve got together with businesses

that were previously your competitors so

you kind of would have have been

avoiding each other and that’s

that’s changing for you as a business

owner as a retail business owner in

Ballarat yeah it’s been great I think

has definitely been an unexpected side

effect for the covert situation and

coming out of that into the new new

normal as people are saying but it has

been really good to actually connect

with previous competitors and really

share that knowledge and information to

to sort of go forward as a unified front

as an industry as a whole sort of help

each other’s support and it’s really

necessary at the moment I think to with

the way things are and the lack of

information that is flowing through from

federal to state to local councils it’s

really really helpful to have those

those connections forming and the thing

I’m also interested in gab I mean

bringing it back to to Janet door coming

in she’s going to be the interim CEO as

voted by Council last night so the

appointment will be for up to 10 months

and she’s already been interviewed in

the media but yesterday and this morning

and she I quote has been saying that

she’s got a mountain to climb with the

future and she’s got to really shake

things up there I have no doubt that she

certainly will be doing that but for you

as a business owner if you were sitting

down with Janet today and you’re a

retail business owner what do you want

to see counsel do differently as a as an

owner they’re going ahead yeah I think

she definitely does have a challenge not

only because of the turmoil from the

council with everything the way it all

went down but also in the current

situation that we’re in with Koger than

everything else that’s going on it’s a

very difficult situation so I don’t envy

her at all but I think what would be

great would be a unified message and

consolidated information that is clear

and easy to implement I think one of the

hardest parts is actually trying to

understand what is the best way to do

things so it would be really really

helpful to have Unified’s

simple clear understanding of what these

new rules and regulations will be and

how businesses

implement and moving forward um what if

you were to look at a 12 months time gap

as an owner they’re of business in

Ballarat what do you want to see

different in 12 months versus where we

are today

even if we’re thinking about your

customers that have perhaps had some

nervousness and reluctance coming

through the doors of your business what

does that look like go ahead yeah I

think for the most part customers have

really been great with helping small

businesses as we’ve started talking

doors they’ve been really supportive

coming in making appointments following

the rules and things that have been put

in place so keeping their social

distance using hand sanitizer as they

into the premise and not coming to their

appointments if they’re actually sick is

really helpful and I think further most

part customers have been adapted really

well to that and then also been excited

to get back to some kind of normality to

go out and get the coffee or get their

hair done and things like that so I

think as customers start to get back

into into communities and small

businesses I think we’ll see some really

great opportunities coming forward and

yeah for those customers who can’t get

back in or you know is still working

from home or have medical issues and

need to stay self isolated for that

little bit longer there’s other ways

that they can support small businesses

with you know Facebook shares and likes

and comments as well as Google reviews

and Facebook reviews for their past

visit so it really does help businesses

grow online and build an online platform

and go from that tech perspectives that

I’ve got as well that is a great way to

build their rankings up in Google to

help that business as a whole as they

start to reopen your your business that

you own is so you’ve got to you’ve got a

hair salon that you own with your wife

and a beauty salon as well and I think

it would be fair to say even though

you’re a tech web guy your online

presence and sophistication probably

hasn’t been where you’ve ideally wanted

to be over the last couple years have

you found yourselves now sitting down

and really ramping some of that up and

wanting to to really lift the game as

far as your online not just having a

website or a Facebook page but how you

do ecommerce and how you get product to

people is that something that’s going to

be a big priority for you now with this

realization that things are changing

quickly yeah absolutely I think online

has always been a big part of a business

but it’s probably now you know really

really important for not only business

to sell her art or to educate people on

what they do but also to implement an

easy way for customers to find

information about what has changed as

well so we’ve actually implemented some

covert policies on our website which

makes it easy for the consumers coming

in to be able to know what we expect of

them as they come in and not to bring

family members and that sort of stuff

our minimum or maximum number I should

say of patrons in each premise and

things like that that information flow

through the web side of things as well

as the e-commerce and online bookings

and all of those sort of things as well

which yeah I think the that

communication flow between business

owners and customers has really really

amped up a lot and over the last few

months it’s sort of given a lot of

business owners a chance to pause and

actually look at the way their business

needs set up online it is from a

holistic approach rather than just

trying to be reactive each time so I

think it’s it’s actually been a really

good opportunity in a way to stop and

think about how that had a position that

went sort of side of things moving

forward one final thought from you

gather as we wrap up here today has been

an incredible afternoon but looking now

at what what scares you what what keeps

you up and worries you now about this

next phase because I kind of when I’m

going out and about and we’re filming

and we’re talking to all these different

businesses about what’s going on I’m

kind of saying now that we’re out of

this phase one of covert 19 we’ve

started now to get back into this new

unnormal normal

and what now if you worried about

anything as a business owner are you

worried about going going ahead yeah

absolutely I think for any business

owner the safety of their staff and

customers is always a high priority

especially with yeah the situation is

does still have a little bit of a risk

with the second wave option that might

sort of happen might not so I think it’s

always in the back of your minds now to

to really heighten that safety aspect

and the communication flow between

employees and employer is is really

strong at the moment which is good so

keeping those communication gateways

open as much as possible to really make

sure that the employees are both

comfortable and safe as well as the

customers as they come in going forward

but yeah definitely a second wave is

that is a bit of a concern at some point

if that does happen but I think the

measures that have been put in place so

far they’re really good and I think for

the most part businesses will be ready

to adapt for that sort of situation if

it does unfold davon Reed Rob thank you

ever so much as always for your insights

on not just technology but business and

how things are going up there in

Ballarat and that is almost it for us

for today for see our live the big news

is that we will be coming up in a few

weeks and broadcasting live from

Ballarat we’re going to send you out

some information on that soon we’re

going to be coming up there we’re going

to be chatting with business leaders

from Ballarat to talk about the future

we’re going to be examining and

exploring how Janet’s been doing in that

first four to six weeks in her role as

interim CEO of Ballarat City Council and

we’ll also be having a look at what the

future looks for like just not for the

city but also for its community the

business and really looking to see how

Ballarat can become a blueprint for

regional business and government of the

future for any of you that have been on

today our if you’re watching live or if

you’re watching this after the event

thank you for joining us here today I

look forward to keeping connected with

you all and seeing you very very soon

have a great rest of the week

you

Okay so good morning and welcome thank you for for joining me this morning for my decision-making workshop we’ve been a workshop the online program we’re extremely fortunate this morning that will be joined by Kyla mamuni who is a leadership sales facilitator a coach and an expert in emotional intelligence and also a very dear friend of mine so thank you so much Kylie for giving us your time and talent this morning and basically in Kylie’s hands so I’m going to hand over to Kylie to keep the session off it’s a great morning wrap thanks Maddie and for those of you that have had the pleasure of seeing Maddie in action before potentially in a keynote this is a really nice opportunity to get to know her a little bit more and in a bit more depth for those of you that may not have had the great fortune to see Maddie speak I just wanted to introduce her and give you a bit of background we’ve been friends for 10 years since she retired from military and every time I see this run sheets I still in gobsmacked by the things that she achieved and I often look at it and think wow he finally I’d had that much tenacity and commitment in my own life so um major mattina jewel broke in the hinterland of Byron Bay and she joined the army at 17 with a 15 year military career and in that time she managed to serve on five overseas missions and earn nine military more medals which is an extraordinary accomplishment for anyone let alone a woman and she is the only Australian to receive to our republic of Lebanon War medals and act for acts of bravery on the battlefield and for being wounded in combat which you’ll see part of that story today which always brings a tear to my eye she completed the physically demanding Navy divers course and managed to serve with American Navy SEALs she tracked down the one and only water Lord in the Solomon Islands good old Jimmy roster and fast rope from helicopters and managed aboard Smuggler’s ships in the Arabian Gulf so if that wasn’t enough already then as she was posted as a peacekeeper for the United Nations in Syria and Lebanon and she was medically retired after that stint and served then on the prong the prime ministerial Advisory Council and we’re very fortunate that she continues to champion change for our injured war veterans among her many honorary roles Medina is a founding ambassador for Project thankfull a movement partnered within the United Nations to help empower women and children globally she’s been featured on ABC’s Australian story so if you haven’t had a chance to see that already it’s well worth looking at and he’s a best-selling also so after that she’s managed to write a book become a best selling author and – here to share her insights on leadership and

resilience from some of the toughest

environments on earth please welcome my

very dear friend mattina Jill thanks so

much Carly for that very warm welcome

and introduction and I mean some of the

audience here we’ve got people that have

seen me give a keynote previously some

of you may not know much about me at all

who are joining for the first time today

to learn a little bit more about the

decision-making module we’re going to

workshop shortly

you

[Music]

I believe that one of our most important

and challenging functions as a leader is

decision-making and the accountability

and responsibility that goes with making

those decisions decision-making is not

easy there are risks associated with

nearly every single decision we make be

it in our work or in our life in general

and these risks can be confusing

stressful frightening and even

paralyzing in the military we spend a

lot of our time on decision making and

the decisions we make not only affect

outcomes they can impact life and death

and often we don’t have much time to

make them so I want to tell you about

one of the toughest decisions I had to

make during my military career I was

serving as a peacekeeper with the United

Nations in Lebanon during the 2006

israel-lebanon war having sustained many

near misses at my tiny UN post patrol

base key arm I was tasked to command a

convoy of two UN armored personnel

carriers and 16 Indian and Ghanaian

infantry soldiers from key armed to our

UN headquarters in the coastal town of

tear at the last minute I was also given

the responsibility of navigation for the

convoy now the transit from kion to T

would normally take you about two hours

to complete but we are now in a war zone

and all the roads that could get me to –

they parallel the border where all the

fighting was most intense Israel was

actually pushing through into southern

Lebanon and the battle on that border

region between the two countries was

ferocious and because of this it took me

over two days to get my convoy through

with near misses from bombs and rockets

from both sides of the war I’d spent two

days desperately trying to find a road

that hadn’t been bombed and would allow

me to reach the headquarters having

exhausted all the roads on my un

provided map with no success

I was able to gain directions from a

Lebanese police officer to cut through a

banana plantation using a dirt road that

wasn’t marked on my UN map

the only problem was that we would

normally not use dirt roads do the risk

of landmines in southern Lebanon but

this was not a normal situation and I

decided it was a risk worth taking that

dirt road did get me to the northern

outskirts of the city of tear

headquarters like had southern side of

the city I just had to get the convoy

through the city itself so that we could

reach the relative safety of a UN

compound during this war but that was

until I received information from my

headquarters that Israel is about to hit

the city with the largest air strike of

the war bad news yes but it got worse

the road I was on was due to be targeted

by the Israeli fighter jets and those

jets were already in the air they were

in bail and their bombing runs and I was

told to expect to see bombs explode

around me at any given moment so if you

ever had a tough day in the office well

this was shaping up to be a tough day

now for me and I was having to make some

very significant decisions high-risk

decisions and I was the commander of

this convoy which meant I was making

decisions that I knew would not only

impact on my life but my decisions would

directly impact in the lives of the 16

soldiers I was responsible for and this

made my decision risk and responsibility

process just that little bit harder to

go through now having mentally gone

through my processes as quickly as I

could I assess my options and I really

only had to turn around return back to

Kiama

or just continue pushing on for that

headquarters in tear tear was by far the

better of those two choices but in the

back of my mind I knew that regardless

of the destination the decision that I

went with so long as I could show and

demonstrate a logical rational thought

process in having arrived at that

decision then I would have the full

backing and support of my hierarchy now

I think this is a very important point

in leaders for organizations where were

wanting people to manage risk if we

don’t give them our full support they

will become risk of

afraid of making the wrong call and I’ll

constantly push all the decisions to

higher levels which creates time delays

and a lot of frustration if we want to

avoid that process it’s up to us as

leaders to create cultures in our

business that do fully support and

empower people in the decision-making

process we must help them manage risk so

that they can be decisive if we can our

people will feel more effective and are

able to take action which in turn makes

our organization more responsive and

nimble rather than choked with time

delays when it comes to decisions and

taking action in Lebanon I use the

decision-making tool that I have

developed and found to be effective in

both split-second decisions as well as

longer-term decision processes a process

that can assist in arriving at the right

decision in brief my decision-making

tool involves assessing the pros and

cons of each option at hand

then reviewing each of the following

aspects to the decision your training

your skills previous experiences gut

instinct or intuition other support

available the time you have to make

decisions which will in turn determine

how much advice or input you can obtain

from your superiors and your team

thankfully my decision in Lebanon to

push on for the headquarters turned out

to be the right call we eventually

arrived at the UN compound and survived

the journey it was the right decision

even though I arrived with my back

broken in five places and internal

injuries after being thrown into the

bulletproof windscreen of my armored

vehicle while it was making evasive

maneuvers I was severely injured but

although my injuries were so severe that

my military career was over I would be

medically retired from the army at least

I was alive something I and the people I

was leading may not have been had I made

the other call to return to Kiama

because tragically the base that we

would have returned to was destroyed by

fighter jets just days later killing all

the pesky

as man in the base my teammates my

friends it wasn’t easy

leadership seldom is but remember you

must create a culture that empowers

people to be able to make decisions in

the army we need soldiers to be decisive

and we have a saying that corporals not

generals run the army and this is

because corporals are at the first level

of leadership in the army

they are on the front line leading

private soldiers the generals are

responsible for the strategic level

thinking and planning but the power to

act needs to come right down to the

soldiers carrying out the commands for

this to happen in the army we are able

to push down decision making to the

lower ranks but the responsibility and

accountability for those decisions it

still remains with the higher levels of

command and this means that you need to

have the trust in your people and also

ensure they are equipped resourced and

skilled enough to make these decisions

as you as the leader are also share the

responsibility it’s a different way of

decision-making from what I’ve

experienced in the corporate sector and

it’s worth exploring to see if it would

improve the way your business operates

imagine if in your workplace that

decisions could be pushed down which

would make processes quicker but

accountability to your customers and

shareholders would remain at the

leadership level it is something worth

thinking about and exploring in every

industry

so now to your workbook where you’ll

have the opportunity to work through the

decision-making tool it’s a good one

which works for both quick and

longer-term decisions and I hope you

practice it and find it as powerful as

it has been for me in making some of the

toughest decisions that I’ve ever faced

[Music]

there is a bit of a mixed audience we

might just sort of a really quick video

that gives a snapshot of what I do my

keynotes it kind of is a highlight reel

from one of those keynotes everybody

said oh really the shortest Matt times

this so it gives you a little bit of a

framework and setup up for what we’re

gonna cover today so I’m just gonna

share my screen with you all and we’ll

just play that video

[Music]

a bit of shrapnel and the blaster on the

the rocket heating the position I should

came over the platform here I’m staring

now

[Music]

I worked damn hard to get to where I was

and I had a fantastic future ahead of me

in the army but in a split second all of

that was gone and I had no say in that

decision there were just so many times

where I really really should have died

what started out as a normal and as a

routine day as a peacekeeper with the

United Nations on the border of Israel

and Lebanon turned into the most

dangerous leadership challenge of my

entire life

I was tasked to command a convoy of UN

vehicles they had roads destroyed by

bombs my movements were restricted by

land mines

but I knew that my decisions would

directly impact on the lives of those 16

soldiers that I was responsible for but

you know sometimes as leaders we have to

be able to just think outside the box

it takes leaders who are courageous who

have the vision to take an organization

in a direction but they may not be a

hundred percent sure about how things

will look on the other side I do really

believe that out of periods of change

even out of great adversity can come

incredible opportunities so long as we

have the courage to pursue them

[Music]

okay so I guess you know the purpose of

just sort of sharing that a little bit I

just kind of bring you all kind of a

little snapshot of some other things

we’re gonna discuss today in that

decision-making model well it’s kind of

frame where my experience comes from in

terms of discussing decision makings

particularly most crisis situations

around a huge pressure to make decisions

to stay alive I thought we might before

we actually get into to workshop being

this module and I’m going to I’m going

to take you through that you know the

main pieces of the modules have got a

really short period of time together and

I’m really conscious to give you as much

opportunity as possible that ask me

questions in this forum with the Q&A and

thank you for everyone that’s shared

questions already if you have questions

as we go through this it’s designed to

be an interactive kind of workshop where

you can ask questions just either use

the chat link so Kylie can manage the

chat box or art doesn’t unmute your mic

if you’ve got a burning question that

you just really need to get to before we

get to the Q&A that’s fine too I’m happy

to be flexible over you I want to get

the most out of this session because

this is your time that I’m really

conscious of but I just wanted a sort of

framework the the leadership and action

online program my team and I are

actually really delighted to be bringing

this to life now we’ve spent literally

more than a year of our time working

really hard on bringing what we thought

with the six key elements for not not

just leaders this is a program that

isn’t just for your executive team

management but I think leaders of every

single lever so levels so either you’re

aspiring leaders and in fact my belief

on leadership is that we’re all actually

leaders I think there are moments in

every career where we’re called upon to

step up and lead and it actually takes a

huge amount of courage to do that if

it’s not part of your daily

responsibilities of being a leader and I

think you know we as humans we’ve sort

of been and certainly for me if it

wasn’t sort of exclusive wasn’t in my

job title in my listed in my roles and

responsibilities to lead sometimes it

makes a bit of a barrier to do that to

step in and lead so that the first

module of this program is actually

sudden leadership and I was talking

about those situations whether you’re a

technical experts that

thinks so much in the corporate space so

many people who have been promoted to a

very senior level because of their

expertise and then suddenly because of

the lever that got to inherited

leadership responsibilities for the very

first time at very senior roles in an

organization and so they’re kind of

thrown in that deep end

so first module is for for everyone in

terms of some leadership and as leaders

helping giving our people opportunities

to lead to help them step up and help

them find that courage inside to lead

regardless of where they are in the

organization because I I believe that we

truly need leaders at every single layer

of a business an organization if we’re

going to be nimble effective and

efficient as an organization the second

module of the program is delegation

there’s a great framework there I know

something with a lot of the corporates

that I’ve worked with over the last 10

plus years have really found that the

tool out of that SAR module really

effective in terms of helping them

delegate with more efficiency third is

that communication and you know how we

can effectively communicate with our

teams to avoid that ambiguity and and to

make sure we’re actually getting the

message across of what our teams need to

hear open up communications both ways

within our organization fourth is

connection as leaders you know it’s

vital that we really do get to know our

people and that very deep level so that

we can put bright person right skills

right job right time so that connection

piece again in organizations is critical

and there’s an entire module there with

the activities for you to to hone those

skills and the fifth module is

decision-making in crop

beautiful is a term that I have created

it’s how I describe my leadership style

and it’s really three kind of tenants to

my style both in military and also its

having left the military and in my

business life so I’ve always looked at

sort of servant leadership as a

particular style as I see myself as a

leader my job is to serve my team I’ve

also really honed in on being an

inclusive leader and the third tangent

of that sound dutiful style is being

able to adapt I think every leader

regardless of industry and organization

you work with right now it’s critical to

be able to be adaptive to environments

because we can’t just apply the one

leadership modus operandi to every

single situation and the only way we can

flex as a leader and bring our team with

us when we do that particular we

transition very quickly is if we built

the trust and respect and rapport with

our team prior so that some that dutiful

leadership kind of packages up the

entire online program how the program

works is that each module has a video

that basically introduces the topic and

shares my personal experiences on having

tackled that particular leadership skill

then it’s an entire workbook that sits

off the video and the whole program is

designed to be online so you can either

do it on your computer your devices with

your mobile phone there’s actually a

tile you can download to actually adjust

instructions on how you can set that up

on your phone so you can do it really

mobile and it’s adult learning to be

able to be done wherever you want you

can be in genetic style do all the

videos um do all the programs you can do

it in you know a six week program if you

want to step it out it’s up to you how

you want to use and interact with your

own program there is also the workbooks

that sit off it there’s on there’s an

opportunity can download your cell phone

print them out or you can purchase the

printed workbooks for each program and

also the the flashcards that go with

each of the modules that you can have as

references you know with you to help you

in hone and embed those skills because

we you know we need to practice new

skills before they become something we

used to employ

in our daily lives so kind of this gives

you a set up of the entire legend option

program but I now want to go into the

decision making one that we’re going to

do today because I think given the

current crisis of what’s happening in

the world so many people have become

overwhelmed with the situation I find it

really hard to make decisions with all

the ambiguity uncertainty that’s going

on around us so I’ve actually made this

entire module free as part of the launch

of the program I’ll share the links at

the end that you can go to to download

the entire module you can use the

workbook and go through it at your own

time we’re just going to kind of just go

through the highlights of that program

today with you to try and help you just

get the most out of that program so I’m

going to start by it I’m just showing

you the video that sits in that module

so I’m going to share screen again and

now take you into that video I believe

that one of them was challenging

functions as a leader is decision making

and the accountability and

responsibility that goes with making

those decisions decision making is not

easy there are risks associated with

nearly every single excision we make

these risks can be confusing stressful

frightening and even paralyzing in the

military we spend a lot of our time on

decision making and the decisions we

make not only affect outcomes they can

impact life and death and although we

don’t have much time to make them so I

want to tell you about one of the

toughest decisions I had to make during

my military career I was serving as a

peacekeeper with the United Nations in

Lebanon during the 2006 israel-lebanon

having sustained many near misses at my

tiny UN posts the Chavez key arm I was

tasked it can either come with two

un ARMA personnel carriers and 16 Indian

and Ghanaian infantry soldiers from Kia

to a human headquarters in the coastal

town of tear at the last minute I was

also given the responsibility of

navigation for the convoy now the

transit from kion’s at sea would

normally take you about two hours to

complete but we are now in a war zone

and all the roads could get me to you

they parallel the poor where all the

fighting was most intense Israel is

actually pushing through in a southern

Lebanon and the Battle of that border

region between the two countries was

ferocious and because of this it took me

over two days to get my convoy through

with near misses from bombs and rockets

from both sides of the war I’d spent two

days desperately trying to find a road

that hadn’t been bombed and would allow

me to reach the headquarters having

exhausted all the roads of a UN provided

map with no success I was able to gain

directions from a Lebanese police

officer to cut through banana plantation

using a dirt road that wasn’t marked

aliyou and now the only problem was that

we would normally not use dirt roads do

the risk of landmines in southern

Lebanon but this was not a normal

situation and I decided it was a risk

worth taking that dirt road did get me

to the northern outskirts as a city of

tear hang corners like a southern side

of the city I just had to get the convoy

through the city itself so that we could

reach the relative safety of a UN

compound during this war but that was

until I received information from my

headquarters that Israel is about to hit

the city with the largest airstrike of

the war Burmese yes but it got worse the

road and I was almost due to be targeted

by the Israeli scientists and those jets

were already in the air dar in Delaware

bombing runs and I was told to expect to

see bombs explode around me so if you

ever had a tough day in the office well

this is shaping up to be a tough day now

for me and I was having to make some

very

decisions high-risk decisions and I was

the commander of this convoy which meant

I was making decisions that I knew would

not only impact on my life but my

decisions would directly impact in the

lives of the 16 soldiers I was

responsible for and this made my

decision risk and responsibility process

just a little bit harder to go through

now having mentally gone through my

processes as quickly as I could I assess

my options and I really only had to turn

around return back to Kim or just

continue pushing on to that headquarters

Intel he was by far the better of those

two choices but in the back of my mind I

knew that regardless of the destination

the decision that our weapons so long as

I could show and demonstrate a logical

rational thought process in having

arrived at that decision then I would

have the full backing and support of my

hierarchy I think this is a very

important point in leaders for

organizations where we’re wanting people

to manage recipe if we don’t give them

our full support they will become risk

of this afraid of making the wrong call

and I’ll constantly push all the

decisions to higher levels which creates

time delays and a lot of frustration if

we want to avoid that process it’s up to

us as leaders to create cultures in our

business do fully support and empower

people in the decision-making process we

must help them manage risk so that they

can be decisive if we can out them it

will feel more effective and are able to

take action which in turn makes our

organization more responsive and nimble

rather than choked with time the layers

when it comes to decisions and taking

action in Lebanon I used the

decision-making tool that I have

developed and found to be effective in

both split-second decisions as well as

longer-term decision processes a process

that can assist in arriving at the right

decision embrace my decision making tool

involves assessing

pros and cons of each option at hand

then reviewing each of the five aspects

to the decision your training your

skills previous experiences got instinct

or intuition other support available at

the time you have to make decisions

which will in turn determine how much

advice or input you can obtain from your

superiors and your team thankfully my

decision in Lebanon to push on for the

headquarters turned out to be the right

call we eventually arrived at the UN

compound and survived the journey it was

the right decision even though I arrived

with my back broken in five places and

internal injuries after being thrown

into the bulletproof windscreen of my

armored vehicle I was making evasive

maneuvers I was severely injured but

although my injuries were so severe that

my military career was over I would be

medically retired from the Army at least

I was alive something I and the people I

was leading may not have been how I made

the other call to return turkey arm

because tragically the base that we

would have returned to is destroyed by

fighter jets just days later killing all

of these keepers man in the base my

teammates my friends it wasn’t easy

leadership sella means so remember you

must create a culture that empowers

people to be able to make decisions in

the army we need soldiers to be decisive

and we have a saying that corporals not

generals from the army and this is

because first level of leadership in the

army they are on the front line leading

private soldiers the generals are

responsible for the strategic level

thinking and planning but the power to

act needs to come right down to the

soldiers carrying out the commands for

this to happen in the army we are able

to push down decision-making to the

lower ranks but the responsibility and

accountability

those decisions it still remains that

the high levels of command and this

means that you need to have the trust in

your people and also ensure they’re

equipped resourced and skilled enough to

make these decisions as you as the

leader also share the responsibility

it’s a different way of decision-making

from what I’ve experienced in the

corporate sector and it’s worth

exploring to see if it would improve the

way your business operates and that’s an

if in your workplace that decisions

could be pushed down which would mean

processes quicker but accountability to

your customers and shareholders would

remain at the leadership level it is

something worth thinking about and

exploring in every industry so now let’s

see your work where you’ll have the

opportunity to work through the

decision-making tool it’s a good one

which works for both quick and

longer-term decisions and I hope you

practice that and find it as powerful as

it has been for me in making some of the

toughest decisions that I’ve ever faced

okay so back to here before I go into

actually talking through the

decision-making framework actions on

framework for decisions I decide give

you a little bit of an opportunity as

any questions after that video if you’d

like to share now I ask the question I’m

not sure gained anything through the

chat box they’re calling up some not be

monetary notes like that so it’s a

responsibility for you today

I should have said that earlier any

questions from anyone otherwise we’ll

just push straight into the

decision-making source that we’ve got

the maximum out of Q&A at the back of

this so again I’ll just share screen and

bring up that tool so you can all see it

similar to that slightly okay so in the

framework you’ve got in front of you now

on the screen hopefully you’ll see that

there’s basically it’s a circle and I’ve

identified the framework to have this

two parts part one is exploration and

part two is kind of how you make those

decisions and putting them into action

and so there’s actually seven steps of

this particular tool I’m just going to

quickly go through them because as I

mentioned you can you can download this

as part of the workbooks that sits off

the complimentary module the

decision-making module and what does

quickly step through so starting at the

top of the circle the step one is

defining the problem I think adding to

this is that sometimes the problems we

get into in decision making is that we

jump in here without asking the right

questions and not finding out more

information so you know it’s about just

taking that moment to make sure you do

understand the extent of the problem

taking into account stakeholder

interests if that’s part of what you

need to do with this particular decision

and it’s about finding the questions and

the right questions to ask right at the

very outset because that can save us a

lot of time in making sure we’ve got the

right problem and therefore making the

right decision step 2 is brainstorming

the solutions and I hope people are

still going to get creative with this

stage because often we kind of jump

through the process too fast and don’t

actually assess that wider options that

we may not actually proceed straight

away we kind of just jump in and get

straight to stage seven sorry stage six

of taking action without kind of

assessing the full gamut of options so

this is the stage if you have time to

seek input from your teams or either

people from lower levels of where you

are of the organization and also from

above to try and brainstorm as many

solutions you can and I find it quite

useful to get visual with this this is

something that works for me I like to

either get this up on a whiteboard with

my team or down on paper see the problem

the problem and the and the options that

we have in front of me

and I find that’s kind of useful to get

that sort of visual option happening if

you have the time to do so a step three

is basically collating and refining all

the options that you’ve come up with

this is the stage where I’d like you to

pay attention to your gut instinct

because sometimes you know our gut

really drives us to the right decision

very quickly and there’s a whole

activity in there in the workbook that

talks about blink and there’s always

research you can go into about how we

can make blink decisions in a split

second and even the research if you

spent time doing it would still bring

you back to that second decision that

you’ve made driven by your gut instincts

so tune into that this is also the stage

where you may need to get top cover if

you need it and to sort of refine the

options that you have the next three

stages are four five and six stages of

the process are the ones that I see as

the really critical parts of the

decision-making model they’re the three

but I think particularly in the business

world that sometimes we miss one of

these so it’s the risk responsibility

and decision and often it’s the

responsibility piece we’ll get to next

that is missed in this process so Stage

four is that risk factors and

contingencies so this is where you’re

really outlining all the pros and cons

of your refines options in front of you

you want to define the key risks and

it’s really good to kind of do an

analysis of the risk versus the rewards

for each of these options you have in

terms of making that decision if you

need to this is a stage or so you make

contingency plans for each of the risks

that you may have identified as key

elements to any of those options that

you’ve got at hand you then go in to

take responsibility which is Stage five

as I briefly mentioned this is the one

that I see a lot of leaders sort of

missing and in the business was one that

we’re not some not kind of paying enough

attention to because if we’re not

prepared to take responsibility for the

decision then we should really be going

back to the start

and going back and refining the process

again and looking at our options

if you’re willing to take responsibility

then you’re going to jump into stage 6

decide and take action and I think this

is where we really need to back

ourselves if we’re accountable for the

decision we’re about to make you know

back ourselves into the decision that

we’re doing and and take the action

often the leaders that I’m working with

are becoming immobilized with fear about

taking that next step of actually taking

action and we can talk a little bit more

about that in Q&A about overcoming and

when we became become stagnant and

unable to take action and because if we

do it’s the step 7 that sort of helps us

override that fear of taking action

because if we want to have momentum in

our decision-making we just know that we

can course correct if we’re making a

decision at least we can and we make the

wrong decision or we get a bit off-track

we can make another decision to get us

back on the on the correct path that we

need to so that step 7 gives us the

opportunity of repeat the entire process

and and course-correct so that’s some

this is really what we call soldiers 5 a

really quick down of duty

just a brief up there what that to look

like and how you can use it it’s worth

trying growth in split-second decisions

and also in longer-term where you’ve got

project time time to analyze decisions

and include others the workbook will

help you’ve actually hone those skills

of each of that and give you the

opportunity to work through it for

yourself so I encourage you to kind of

download that workbook to use it

I might just stop sharing the screen so

I can actually see you all again and see

if there’s any questions at this stage

and Carly you might want to jump in to

talk about the tool if you’ve got any

questions – thanks Maddy and I’m not

sure about all of you I work in the

world of helping people develop in this

space and leadership and it constantly

amazes me how decision-making can be

overlooked as a serious priority or

enough time spent in there and Maddy I

have a question for you on step three

you

you mentioned the term top cover when

you talk about top cover what is it that

you mean by that specific stage where if

you need to get higher approvals or you

need someone with a might have a more

strategic view then you have they might

have more information to the problem

you’re solving and that’s the stage

where you might want to just check in

have you got the authority to make the

decision is it is there other resources

you might need and those types of things

that you might need in the next step

where you know you’re training your

skills the right resourcing and

importantly at the time that you’ve got

to make the decision or come in that

step four so it’s just getting an

earlier step three that’s making a check

of is this in my scope is this something

I need to be that I’m authorized to make

a decision on or cannot let’s just get

some input from high command it’s not

yeah beautiful and I think what’s really

interesting is that theses are a

collaborative approach which is what I

know you to be and you’re always

engaging with others in their expertise

to find the best outcomes for the

solution how do you encourage people to

do that

when there’s got to be a quick decision

made what are some of the steps that

you’ve activated when you’ve begged I’m

cool

yeah great question Kyle I think I’m

timing is one of those really critical

factors of decision making so my

preferred stars are leaders you’ve kind

of said as an inclusive leader is and

I’ve had the pleasure of just working

with incredible people in my military

career both Australian and forces and

international and an often in command of

soldiers that were highly skilled highly

trained so I had technicians that had

had knowledge around particular

activities so a lot of my career as

amphibious warfare commander I was the

army commander on HMS cannon besides

specialized in amphibious warfare as a

diving officer on board that ship and so

in that role that capacity at times I

would have

up to a thousand soldiers that I would

need to coordinate getting off multiple

Navy ships simultaneously where I’ve

used at times I had six helicopters ten

watercraft to get those personnel off

those ships and put them a shore but n

shal e into enemy terrain we’re doing

that on operations in the Middle East

and you know when you’ve got that many

people moving parts I don’t know how to

fly a helicopter I don’t know how to

operate this thing

yes no I’m gonna pilot and I had a

faster act out of the back up on but um

but you know it’s it’s drawing on the

skills that you have in your team and so

I Zelena had these you know specialists

in my team that had that I had to

include in my decision-making in order

to make sure that you know I didn’t know

how to understand you know artillery

guns and the helicopters to get them

assurance in the Middle East so I had to

rely on the people in my team with the

knowledge but as a leader it wasn’t my

job to know how to do that I just need

how to bring those resources the

strengths of the people that I had in my

organization to allow them to

effectively do the job that they were

trained to do and so that’s when you

have time so I would bring all of those

specialists in to when we’re organizing

a project a mission get their input when

time permitted I would always always

utilize their knowledge and they knew

that my role as a leader was to make the

decision so I would get their input

knowledge but it may not necessarily

mean that I took the action that they

might have thought that I’m you know I

have to look at the high level what was

happening as well and make the decision

I think that sometimes their role as a

leader is to make those decisions but I

would always try at least just get the

input of my team if I had the time but

then there are situations and if you

hurt the trust and respect of your

people first then when it comes to those

phones where you don’t have the time to

make a decision you just have to jump in

and take control of the situation and be

decisive then your team will accept not

having that input in the

that trust and respect and so you know

during that the Lebanon War I taught in

their video package about some

commanding that convoy two armored

personnel carriers and those sixteen

indian and guard named infantry soldiers

and you know i’ve never actually met

those soldiers until I hopped in those

vehicles so it was kind of this I had no

idea of their skill sets they had no

idea about my experiences as a leader

and I simply had to put their life in my

hand and trust me that I would do my

best absolute best to try and get them

to safety through that journey you know

that two-hour drive actually took two

days under fire from both sides of the

war from the Hezbollah and Israel I’m

bombing to get us through so it wasn’t

like it was a smooth transition to get

us there we cannot attack many times

during that transit and you know as I

talked about probably little bit more

detail out there in that video package I

would have liked to have involved those

soldiers in the decision given that

there I was making life-and-death

decisions but simply it was that time

factor that I just didn’t have that I

had to make a decision because often in

these moments of crisis a decision is

better than no decision the absolute

worst thing I could have done at that

moment in the war knowing that fighter

jets were coming in I had asked for

advice from the UN headquarters but

there was two UN forces operating in

Lebanon at the time and actually got

conflicting advice from those

headquarters one recommended best chance

of survival was to return to key arm and

others said you know push on for Tia and

that left me as the commander on the

ground that full responsibility to make

that final call and decision and I

simply didn’t have time and on the team

I would have liked to but if I had up we

may not have all in here today so there

are times that you do just have to jump

in and I think it’s important in those

crisis moments in particular in terms of

decision making when you’re under those

huge pressures and particularly if lives

are on the line you need to take action

and keep a momentum in

decision capacity so that even if we

make the wrong decision we can make

another one and get back on track it’s a

it’s the worst case when you become

stagnant in the crisis because once

you’ve stopped making decisions it’s

been a really massive step to make that

very first decision advice and that is

if we can try and chunk down that

decision break it down into smaller ones

and you know make more decisions that

kind of built our confidence in a

decision capacity that was a very long

answer to your question there’s so many

elements to what you just talked about

and I think and what always fascinates

me when I watch the Australian story

again or I see your video packages and

how you’re operating under pressure and

is this ability to make decisions when

potentially there was fear involved

because we’re human right and while

you’re a highly trained soldier who I

have the pleasure of seeing you make

decisions just in daily life and I

watched your process because it it

strikes me is such a capable process

what I’m interested in particularly at

the moment with the the world in the way

it is and people are fearful of what’s

happening how do you suggest we overcome

fear and the uncertainty to push through

and take action he took about taking

those steps earlier so you know those

bite-size small chunks but what are some

other strategies that you employ to be

able to help you do that yeah and look

fear is obviously part of when you’re in

a war zone there is fear absolutely I

mean I’ve been asked a lot of time

talking were you terrified and like yes

of course I guess there are you know

people losing their lives around us

there’s a lot going on and thankfully

the military training kicked in were

made that I was able to continue making

decisions and I think in many ways you

know leadership is actually bit of a

double-double

sorting that you know sometimes there’s

that burden of leadership is that you

have to make these decisions knowing the

consequences you know can be huge I mean

my biggest fear as an army officer

wasn’t actually been injured or killed

myself on the battlefield my fear was

that I would make a decision that would

lead to the injury or deaths of one of

my soldiers and thankfully you know I

didn’t that never happened in my career

but it was something that always sat in

the back of my mind and I had to kind of

override that and say you know what you

can only ever do your best in these

moments if you follow your gut instincts

you follow your training you do your

absolute best

and then there’s an element of luck in

all of this and that you know I had a

155 millimeter high-explosive artillery

shell land 15 meters in front of me as I

was running to the bunker on patrol base

key arm and it wasn’t my training my

skills my great response in that moment

that I survived it was that yes there’s

a partial ignition the heights that a

canister caught on fire put the shell in

but I need two three pieces it only had

a partial detonation and so you know

that shell should have shattered into

over 2,000 pieces of hot metal shrapnel

which at that close range you know would

would most likely been a fatal hit and

so you know I always bled to Izzy’s

element and black but we can only ever

do our best in those moments and so long

as we’re taking action yeah that’s all

that our team can ask them as an us all

that we can ask of ourselves as well and

kind of try and remove that pressure

because there’s enough pressure on us as

it is let alone putting our own pressure

lay it on top of the situation so the

other piece was the fear I think it come

often people try to avoid fear try and

remove that emotion and I think that

probably you know when we fight things

it just intensifies and so I found that

you kind of need to desist with that

emotion and understand that the fear

that you’re feeling is actually a normal

natural response to the environment that

you’re in and if we can sit with that

and kind of get comfortable with that

fear sensation so that we can continue

operating in the face of fear that’s

when we can remain

in those crisis situations and I think

the military the Army in particular very

good at putting us in training scenarios

and yes they are simulations nothing is

as good as actually being on the

battlefield and experience in that

warfare firsthand there’s always a

question of like will these skills kick

in when I’m you know in in the live

moment rather than just rehearsing your

you know training in the military but

the military continue to punch you under

these high pressure scenarios trying to

simulate the battlefield as best as they

can with that chaos that uncertainty and

keep making you happy to make decisions

yeah remember is a cadet at Duntroon

you’d always have you know the field

sergeant behind you as you know these

scenarios that are unfolding in front of

you that you didn’t expect the enemy to

do and you’ve got this sergeant yelling

at you you know what are you gonna do

now true commander what are you gonna do

now and and you just forced to and

you’re thinking I don’t know what I’m

gonna do now yeah kind of you know keep

that emotion aside ago ok I just need to

remain calm and probably one of the

things in co-leader where I’ve been

working with them a neuroscientist

called Alan Parker who has kind of

actually stepped through what happens in

the brain and asked me to talk through

my experiences on the battlefield and

kind of it’s quite fascinating to hear

him dissect what is actually having a

chemical neuroscience level in making

those decisions and the key thing I’ve

learned from working with Alan is the

importance of breathing in that moment

yeah taking that breath it wasn’t

something I was aware that I did because

even when he would ask me to talk

through the moments I would find myself

taking this big breath of air in and he

would stop me and say yeah that’s

exactly what you’re doing you’re

oxygenating the brain so that you can at

least make the best decision at that

moment if we stop and we freeze and we

hold our breath then we’re not going to

potentially make the right decisions so

the breath is one of those things that

helps you kind of calm yourself overcome

that fear in the moment to get into that

logical rational process rather than

allowing our emotions to override us and

then potentially make the wrong decision

so and thank you because I think um

there are so many elements to keeping a

level head um and probably the most

profound having worked in that or

working in the behavioral and

neuroscientist space myself is the

breathing and I’m sure everyone on this

call understands that we we operate in

two locations either mammalian brain

which is breathing really low in our

diaphragm or reptilian brain which is

breathing high and often reptilian brain

breathing high is that fight-or-flight

process so you’re taking in that be deep

breath is alleviating that fear which is

a really interesting because in the

civilian world I do not have a commander

behind me going make the decision make

the decision make the decision right we

we now operate in this civilian world

and and it always fascinates me because

you and I both laugh that me being in

the military rather it would have been

entertaining I’m not sure but yeah very

interesting so I’ve got a great question

here how does leadership in the military

which we think very clearly defined

chain of command

compared with leadership in the civilian

world yeah question that’s a great

question um there’s a couple of things

there I think yes we do have this

clearly defined chain of command a

little bit more defined than most

organizations which allows us when we

are in crisis to make decisions that the

soldiers will follow the decisions but

it works both up and down the chain of

command when we empower our soldiers and

I think the Australian Defense Forces is

quite different to other forces around

the world I think a lot of words things

probably not very helpful in terms of

you know the image that a lot of people

think of the military is is really

hierarchy Authority no sir yes sir kind

of situation our Defence Force operates

very differently our soldiers are highly

trained because we have a really small

Defence Force in terms of our

personnel and so our people are highly

skilled really highly trained most of

our soldiers have degrees they’re

experts in the skills that they’ve got

so unlike other forces where they’ve got

sheer mass of personnel I can throw each

scenario and they have officers

overseeing and making the decisions and

the soldiers aren’t able to make

decisions and if explore sort of works

different that’s I just kind of want to

flag that it’s a little bit very helpful

yeah but we do have that capacity the

chain of command in crisis to give

orders and they will be carried out with

the timeframes you know that time

pressure and so they will be followed

but I think you know as I mentioned hone

in that video package one of the key

things that I’ve seen different between

military and business and all sorts of

different organizations civilian

organizations is that ability to really

empower people down to the lower levels

who are on the operations because we it

is that time factor we need them to be

empowered to make decisions because

otherwise people will die if that if the

soldiers on the front line can’t make a

decision and go you know that yeah we

plan for scenario so we have our

strategy you know and we have our backup

plans plant an ABC and we have all these

actions on a scenario a happens we’re

going to do these follow-on actions to

counteract that but you know we can’t we

can’t control the enemy and actually

ever saying in the military of nothing

survives contact with the enemy so you

can come up with all these great plans

but you also have to empower your people

to have that flexibility and empowerment

so that when scenarios that occurs that

no one’s thought could happen that

people can respond quickly make a

decision and take action and not have to

go through all the strategic layers to

get up to the generals to say yes okay

we’re going to bend over the force over

here so it is that kind of flexibility

that I think the military need as a

requirement of the operating

environments that we work in that is

different to many of the organizations

I’ve worked with since leaving the

Defence Force I think you’ve made a

great comment or my understanding there

is that ability to empower you

people to understand their level of

decision-making which I imagine links

really nicely to your delegation module

in your leadership training yeah

so that you’re able to connect with the

right levels of capability with the

right levels of delegation that’d be

something that you find important

absolutely and it’s that responsibility

piece as I mentioned you know yes my

soldiers can take action but I as their

leader will still be responsible for the

outcome of what happens so as a leader

you need to have that trust in your

people and part of that as we’ve

highlighted you can’t do that feeling

safe in the knowledge without having

delegated effectively and that was one

of my biggest weaknesses as a leader was

delegation my preferred stars kind of a

little bit of a perfectionist I like I

like to do things well and you know that

mine said if I didn’t do it myself

I know it’s right yeah I found myself in

situations I simply could not do

everything on my own with you

controlling a thousand personnel getting

off multiple Navy ships simultaneously

couldn’t do all that so I had to learn

really fast around delegation and really

getting that very clear arcs of fire

where we wanted our people to go and

what what we wanted them to achieve I

said yes delegation is a key part of

when you’re going to give if you’re

going to take responsibility for someone

else’s actions you need to delegate it

effectively to do so yeah and clearly

communicated as well yeah I had a lovely

question here from Mike Whitelaw and he

asks the series of recent crisis has

reshaped how our leadership teams

operate decisions cycles are shorter

governance processes compressed

ambiguity accepted daily

cross-functional planning now the norm

and a renewed focus on the customer to

name a few how would you recommend

embedding these into our culture rather

than reverting to the old ways when

these restrictions of kovita lifted yeah

fantastic question Mike and thanks

thanks for throwing that curveball it’s

a really good question or not because

I’ll do my best I thought I’d ask answer

um I think the organization’s are seeing

the positive benefits of what’s actually

happening on protein so I think the

remain organized a shion’s it’s simply

by prove it to standard practice as we

used to there’s lots of benefits of the

way that we’ve changed operating and I

think one of those is actually decision

making we’ve had to make decisions

faster than our normal processes and

Mike’s alluded to government processes

there I mean they have condensed

timeframes the things that government

has done in this you know few weeks that

Kobe passed in Australia the speed that

they’re getting those things out those

changes are fantastic and I think it’s

because we’ve had to make decisions

faster than we normally would and it’s

the time factor or we’ve had to take

action and trying to embed that the

second part of Mike’s question around

the culture piece and what cultures are

you know I love talking about cultures I

find you know organizational cultures

are fascinating because they’re one of

those things that are really hard to

change quickly you know I actually talk

about time and persistence in changing

culture because how fortunate for

leaders shifting people’s mindsets

changing that culture till it becomes

embedded and honed and an accepting

organization and is then actually shown

as behaviors that the organization does

rather dis cultural statements that

takes time and great leaders to drive

that process and it takes persistence to

live the culture rather than just have

it on a glossy doing brochure at the

front office so um I think it’s gonna

take leaders to pull the benefits of

this and take that forward I think we’ll

also before–this by our employees that

some people will go I’ve got more

flexibility in the way that I was

operating this we don’t need to be face

to face as much we don’t need to fly to

our meetings we can do things

differently more efficiently and get

more time back and I think lots and lots

of changes and the organizations that

will benefit

flexible I’m willing to work and get on

the front for that change really quickly

and it’s very interesting that you say

that something else you’d like to add

there I know is this going to bring back

to that cultural piece though that takes

a long time for everyone to get on board

to have it embedded into something

positive and it’s that mindset that

leaders need to be helped shift and

shape mindsets because again it leads

into change right and you know we all as

human beings are resistant to change

and I’ve been talking my keynotes about

how for me it’s been out of those

moments of change and even adversity

that have created the greatest

opportunities in my life and it takes

courage for us to shift our mindset and

embrace the change rather we naturally

as humans we fear and resist change you

know we get comfortable in our operating

Styles yes look at the world at the

moment you know we all got so

comfortable about how we operated

globally and that’s just then flipped on

its head in 2020 so I think there

organizations that will do best out of

the current situations of those that

have the most flexibility and are quick

to change and embrace and it’s like the

Ellen Parker’s sayings of you know that

was then this is now and and moving

forward the more you resist and want to

hold on to the then that no longer

exists the harder it is is going to be

to move forward to the new operating

models it’s an interesting process and

you I think your message has been very

consistent as through this conversation

around flexibility and in motion and in

emotional intelligence profiling we have

the ability to understand how flexible

or not flexible people are in how they

operate and the other thing that you’ve

mentioned there around culture and I

think that perhaps very interesting

would you say that being connected with

your people and really understand and

understanding them and having that

connection will help that cultural shift

date more easily absolutely I’ve been

doing a lot of executive round tables

for the corporates over the last few

weeks and one of the things I’ve been

saying is what people really need from

their leaders right now so know they

care so it’s that connection

reaching out and my recommendation in

terms of communicating that to people is

communicates more frequently and in

smaller bites because people are bit

overwhelms they can’t take a lot in at

the moment so increase the frequency but

make it shorter tiny head with them and

if nothing else just reach out to them

in show that you care because that’s

what people are nearing that reassurance

of knowing that not on their own going

through this situation and that

connection module has a lot of how you

can build that even in remote remote

region so a number of the operations

that I served on my team are in

different countries so you know we were

forced to actually find that connection

and communicate not in that face-to-face

invite which is much easier right you

know hey I’m doing a workshop like this

is so much easier when I’ve got you all

in the room I can read your body

language I can see your faces we can

interact doing things through a screen

makes it makes you know takes it up a

level it makes it so much harder but

we’re just gonna work harder to try and

get that connection and rapport through

a barrier well we need to think about

providing people with sanity as opposed

to solutions is another dear friend of

ours has said Michael Greendale that you

know providing that sanity rather than

then solutions is what our people need

right now we’ve probably got time for

one last question and if you’re okay I

have a question from Michael head how do

you commit to a new habit of decision

making if that’s not normal for someone

now no kinda links a little bit back

into just talking about it’s not normal

we’ve got a I’ve got a shift from

resisting it to embracing us that sounds

easy like I say it’s just embrace the

new world it’s you know it’s it’s not

easy but it’s part of that if we can do

that that was then this is now

and

and stop fighting holding on to what no

longer exists that easy we’re going to

transition to the new norm and just to

kind of reinforce that of almost as

letting go and I think you know one of

the things here is is that uncertainty

piece now we all are getting stressed

about you know we don’t know how long

this is going to go for and I you know

I’ve had the same situation in my

military career knowing when war start

yeah you don’t know how long the wars

gonna go for but what you do know is

that unit you and your team need to be

ready to respond for as long as it takes

and and you need to have that little bit

of reserve ready to go the next day and

the next day until you find that it’s no

longer required and you can move on so

it’s about that mindset of just keeping

going and you know in the Army would say

it’s just another 700 meters because

it’s you know in the commander’s got us

lost and everyone’s asking how much

further to the destination 700 meters

because if you said you know a kilometer

yeah that’s far but everyone can push

very 700 meters it’s not that far but

you know it’s an unknown distance so you

can drag 700 meters out so like 10

kilometers west of 700 meters and I use

that yes

you use that analogy like it’s just

another 700 meters and we’ve just got a

have it in us to push to that next a

little bit to get through another 700

meters brilliant many um we’re just

about on time I know there’s some things

that you want to close out with thank

you everyone for being here today

I always find it inspirational being

involved in your program so thank you

very much and I’ll hand back to you

before I do Thank You Kylie thank you to

you for sitting that Q&A and being with

us this morning it’s a great gift to

have your skills wisdom and experience

in the room with us this morning so

thank you I just wanted to finish today

by thanking you all for your time for

for joining in today

if you’ve got any questions after this

feel free to send them through I just

wanted to let you know there’s sort of

three options that I’ve got clear forth

is that the free module that I talked

about the link to that is this Matina

jeweled up online so the free

decision-making module the rest of the

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you

Many welcome back welcome back everybody thank you and welcome to our wider audiences has joined us today for this free webinar but we’re talking about how to have calm conversations through the current crisis that we’re facing globally I’m delighted today to be joined by my co-host mr. Alan Parker and Alan is a behavioral neuroscientists specializes in micro behaviors and Alan you might don’t expand on that a little bit of some of your expertise a skill set that you have Thank You Manny.

Yes, I’m a peculiar at the safety behavioral scientists and I don’t have a formal qualification in neuroscience but I’ve been reading it and writing in it and studying it for 40 years and I’m fascinated on the moment of choice that we all have at any point in time particularly at a time right now when not only could we say this is difficult to intelligence but this is auniversally new experience for virtually everyone on the planet and it is it sort  of makes most of the conversations I think that we’ve been having about change seem like a dress rehearsal and and I’m just came to have the opportunity to be with you work with you and as many people as we can to explore what our options are? what things we could do you indifferent? Yeah no no still why do you join me for a

similar webinar back in January

happening in Australia yes we had such

amazing positive feedback about that

webinar globally you know that the

messages from that discussions that you

and I had did have a global reach and

touch people and help them through

different types of crisis so I guess you

know we’ve had so many people responding

and over the weeks as the co beat 19

situation has expanded I’ve been kind of

inundated by requests from people to try

and get you and I back together again so

that we could have some more discussions

now with the current class crisis which

is literally impacting people around the

entire world I don’t know anyone on the

planet right now that isn’t impacted in

some way with this current situation mmm

yes and it’s and it’s that’s not in any

sense we did that but I I don’t know

that there’s been an error or two of my

day passed we I didn’t had some

continuation of that taking place who is

receiving messages from the people

people were talking about it and it it

really made me

very away that number one there was a

huge need in human beings to come

together and to have the opportunity to

interact support had conversations

shared their experiences and and I think

it’s a treat to have the opportunity now

to turn what was an event into an

ongoing process I’m thrilled to be here

meet you on that you know change at work

work with you and hopefully help people

who are feeling a little bit anxious

right now as we’re live-streaming to a

global audience right now LMU and I

caught up last week to have some

conversation it’s actually filming case

as has turned out that we wouldn’t be

able to sit in the same room together

and we recorded a video and I’d like to

now to show some of the highlights of

that video to our audience what do you

get to see this this is new yes

that was in and this is now and it’s

something that wasn’t expected and these

new yeah I think you know you were

talking on Alan about trying to remove

the word crisis out of that you’re

saying its new rather than crisis yeah

because that crisis word kind of puts us

into more likely a state of panic or at

least heightened anxiety around a fear

factor something that is just new and

and Mary I think

to call the crisis if we’re not doing

the things that the experts are asking

us to do yes good if you know look at my

own work

lift I left my office in Sydney ten days

ago and none of us have been back and I

flew home here to the tweed area and

I’ve only been out of the house exclude

the fact that I’ve been going downstairs

to swing on a regular basis because the

chlorine water is a but not actual

living chlorine water so it’s a good

safe place to be bit of largely being

inside the apartment that whole time

which is extremely different thought it

normally do and if I can’t let go those

things that I was expecting to be able

to do normally that I can’t do now how

do you how do you shift your mindset

then to be able to let go I guess for

but the video is anyone watching this is

to be able to take something tangible

away how do we help people with that

letting go process yeah well many this

is probably where the people who work

with us before will be fine but the

people who are new to us I need to warn

them how eccentrically and and help Akio

him and that I’m an experimental

behavioral scientist and I’m always

looking at what things can we do that we

don’t normally do so what is new that’s

out of my normal routine that I could do

right now that would completely change

my internal experience how I feel yeah

what I sense what I’m thinking just the

speed of the chatter inside my head

and I think we we can all do with Zook

whitening down no the minute I take what

I’m thinking about a feeling or

experiencing and I pay more attention

further out wider which is part of all

this beautiful viewers is so useful you

can’t watch you and me without being

calm by the background just the birds

the birds in this peripheral sound now

when we can enclose ourselves in a house

our peripheral brain function reduces no

he’s an experiment for everybody to do

be inside notice your mind chatter

notice how fast it is notice how loud it

is notice whether it’s positive or

negative notice if there’s questions or

just statements walk outside the door

stand on about

I’d and breathing you go silent inside

Mary I think I might have you back again

how amazing how amazing that we we did

that that time having discussions and

talking about all the various things in

that gorgeous setting just on the off

chance that we weren’t able to be down

and and it’s an amazing I look at that

and got distracted by how creative I am

of the fact that we can normally going

and do that when today we’re in

difference for the circumstances yeah

absolutely

so I’m for our audience to that that I’m

fortunate wasn’t the highlights real we

had little bit of a technical hitch

there that was just one of the videos

you can actually watch all of the videos

they’re free and available on the web

sites which is calming conversations

calm and you can go much any of those

the entire package there for the entire

interview that Al and I had together and

I’m so glad on that we did have kept for

cider to do that me too obviously

interviews like this are much more

difficult to run is the new letting

curve for both of us in having to so

heavily on technology we’ve had a few

today already and having to evolve as we

go along to the new what is new and the

now new norm

hmm in depth that you know will be

regular and unscheduled things that we

never imagined and yeah interruptions

that we never thought we’d be

encountering

yeah it’ll it’ll be a time of you

introduced it their word crises at one

point and it’s a a time where those

changing circumstances will be so

regular when likely to just get to the

point of going off there’s another new

yeah and when constant change in newness

may become a norm in a way we’ve not

known it before yeah I think certainly

even even over time there are few

decades say change is happening to us

faster now certainly in a business

setting that I think you know our

ability to adapt the businesses that can

adapt and be flexible and involve the

fastest find the new initiatives a new

way of operating are the ones that

survive and I think I think we are we’re

experiencing change faster than we ever

have previously and I’ve also heard it

said that change will never be as slow

as it currently is right now so if

that’s true then I think we need to

strap ourselves in for a lot of change

and that as you that you might be right

that this is the new norm that change

will just be consistent and continuous

and evolving and we’re gonna need to

change our mindset dramatically because

it’s a natural very much he thrust a

fear and resist change it’s about I

found Overmind

you know military and and career as a

peacekeeper of United Nations in the

Middle East that it’s about sort of

sitting with that uncomfortable emotion

where we want to fear resist change and

finding a way to push through that you

remove those limitations and boundaries

of what we thought might be possible and

a not gonna tears out of these periods

of adversity and change that can come

incredible opportunities yeah hurry

change our mindset to one that’s

positive the nature of the immediate

present change if I were working with a

group of executives now and we were

sitting in the boardroom and saying the

usual hey what’s going on here what are

we going to do it would be important to

highlight that the amount of mandated

change its taking place at the moment is

probably at a volume in a rage and

extent that we have never

in the head you know loft on a normal

the hundreds of things we just take the

brains of everyday

they’ve always fans and be taken away

and and there’ll be a certain number of

us who who are the the imaginative

creative rebellious trailblazers the

pioneers who want to make choice in

module innovate and want to be the

trailblazer

and who are going to find this mandated

change that calling on them to be quite

a debt to use your word it’s going to

call on them to be adaptive and I think

adaptation my ability to be observant of

what’s going on and taking all of the

variables and consider how can I adapt

to that in a way that’s productive and

useful for me and others will be I think

many I I’m very mindful having been

doing a lot of work in the education

world of late I’m very cognizant at the

moment of the change in families in

parenting could I get you to be numb for

a minute and just talk to me a little

about how is it in this changing

circumstance as a mum and a parent it’s

significant as a mum myself with two

beautiful little girls there are five

and a seven year old the amount of

change that’s happened just in the last

week or two

for our family has been extraordinary

the closer of the school and my

daughter’s there

school they’re in kindergarten than you

to tube now go into an online schooling

platform which even this school wasn’t

thinking that would be rolling out in

2020 it was something thankfully they

had planned and organized and had that

foresight and vision to create but had

never been tested so you know to have

that experience of you know for me on in

a single day I went from my normal

business my normal role as a mother as a

wife to suddenly adding to that equation

they need to become a home teacher

helping educate our children I’m not on

any restrictions on food I think series

everywhere at the moment but she’s sorry

she can’t do that that’s an idea of

homeschooling for Syria but you know

having to now flex and adapt and pick up

a new skill set that wasn’t part of my

goals for 2020 I didn’t have on the list

to to start you know taking a bigger

role in educating my children at home

and so there’s this sudden shift and I

see there’s positives and negatives

about that

you know I’m looking at as a great

opportunity to become more involved in

my children’s education yeah it’s not

something I probably want to do

permanently because it there’s a huge

amount of energy in Memphis in this

which leaves less time for other things

like my business but it’s required a lot

of adapting and also just taking a

breath just hmm Wow didn’t expect that

to happen this week how are we going to

tackle this one kids and also putting my

hand up with saying you know you know

I’m your mum I’m now in this new

scenario with you I’m gonna do my best

my absolute best for you guys but some

let’s just try and take a little bit of

pressure off I’ve not done this before

this is new to me as well and so when

we’ve had some of those technical

difficulties of the the school curricula

be you know the lessons sort of falling

over to

IT issues you know frustrations from

everyone involved just trying to take

that moment set the pressure off I guess

I encourage anyone the audience there

that might have had similar situations

this week but just just take the

pressure off and we can only do our best

in this this new scenario we find

ourselves in yeah how do you is a mom in

that circumstance let let the girls know

that right now on mum

and now I’m transitioning for mum I’m

now the home teacher mrs. mum and missus

no this is not in you mind how you sort

that out with them so that they don’t

get confused by the the – um a couple of

thoughts before I start then I had a

friend share with me that um she

actually has her children’s stand and

sing the national anthem in the morning

to set the framework so they definitely

need are in school routines age

I haven’t done that with my children but

I had a good bit of a laugh at that but

I think it’s about some make a nice

clear boundaries because we’re all now

in our own homes with apartments in a

house wherever you live

trying to find a little for children but

but for all of us trying to find the

space to do all the different things we

need to do and the different roles we

need to play at different stages of the

day so the first things I did with my

girls my husband helped clear their

desks cuz they were just sort of covered

in all sorts of things that was like I

can’t we need to clearer a workspace for

you and this is gonna be where you do

school and really identify that this is

the zone of learning this is where

you’re going to be in that student time

frame and daddy and I are gonna play the

teacher you know along with the help

from the school with the curriculum we

need to get through each day and then

cited that once that times finish and

really making sure that we cut off the

time of like we clearly define this is

the end of the school day yeah we then

go on to another activity we’ve been

shooting try and do some physical

activities with our kids to get them out

so they help run some energy on them

that might be a little bit more

difficult as we move forward into

different stages of lockdown but at

least is shifting whatever we’re doing

and making it clear that we’re no longer

mrs. mum missus mr. dad teachers we’re

now back to being parents many the fact

that you knew in clink both had some

workplace at home and and you’ve all

read it the girls are already used to

those boundaries being clearer with you

having less time for that and more time

home schooling you need to make any

changes to how you doing your beat

don’t mrs. business role and and he said

messages you’d have there for people who

are working from home now and how you

successfully manage that relationship

with the girls that would be useful for

people to hear that yeah to basically

against it some time frames and some

parameters about in the space where

fortunately we home we have a number of

rooms feel really empathetic towards the

people that are in apartments where it’s

much smaller confined space but we

basically making it clear that when

mommy or daddy are in their office and

for Clint it’s been a huge transition

he’s had to go from an external office

to moving back home and to set up the

home office again and make that the

primary place of his work and you know

that’s been a transition in itself to

just for the two of us to try and you

know share office space ship prioritize

it’s been an interesting experiment to

use your words of language in team work

in our house

okay well writing the time and I know

some friends that are both parents work

and they’ve done okay morning shifters

dad’s the teacher mum’s working

afternoon shift the reversal so they

have dedicated time each day with the

children doing education or working on

their business and really kind of create

that delineation and I guess you know a

tough thing here is keeping that

discipline and also keeping flexibility

around what’s practical ya know with

that maybe in the timing you and some of

the things we’ve got late coming in the

day is a bit about and how to step into

the role of being and I want to say home

Luna and what what would be effective

you’ve deducted this new role in the

last four or five days if you made one

of two questions that you could ask a

group of teacher experts yeah says pre-k

I need a fast-track course in hella be

aa stimulator what yes two most

important questions that you’d ask a

group of educators probably ask them

what’s the what’s the best thing I can

do right now what what can I do as a

parent you know and also assisting in

education what’s the best role I can

play right now where I can learn those

skill sets of being able to encourage

and support my child and also to be able

to pick up where they’ve made mistakes

in a way that enhances their learning

not shuts down the will to try that’s

how to go so you know finding that

separation because it’s a different role

that teachers play with students to now

parents playing with students and I

meant anyone who has chosen parietal

this to do homeschooling has prepared

themselves for that and you know

set up an alert skillsets – in order to

be able to oscillate between those

completing roles but I guess it’s you

know for me find that flexibility and

some of my military training has helped

a lot with that of being able to adapt

through those different roles and and I

think for me I’m really conscious about

how my children feel right now so

opening up dialogue with them that’s

appropriate obviously my – a little a

young but they’re still absorbing a lot

of information more than we probably

give them credit for either through just

you know the news being on or or just

picking up the vibes from the parents or

anyone that they’ve had the opportunity

to interact with and understanding

what’s the appropriate level of

conversations I have with the cute so

that actually so far we’ve just been

asked in how do they feel is anything

they want to share their questions

concerns because I think for a lot of

kids they’ll come out of this you know

they won’t really remember the things

they learnt but they will remember how

they felt during this entire phase

that’s impacted the world so that’d be

my two questions for the any educators

what and you’ve been giving your

background because most people I know

your background probably has more well

what we’ll be doing is completely gone

in a minute and and now you’ve got

something completely totally different

and in taking your circumstance often

high high safety risk is dropped upon

you in seconds just pull out one of

those important moments then and just

unpack a little bit about how did you

adjust to this new world that turned up

in seconds yeah bit well maybe if I

describe it and you can help me unpack

it Alan because Alyssa

doing that I guess across 15 years of

being officer in the Australian Army and

also serving with UN as a peacekeeper in

Syria and Lebanon and there’s so many

times from ICONic career was really

thrown in the deep end or things changed

suddenly but probably the most poignant

moment was when I was serving with

United Nations in Lebanon as an unarmed

peacekeeper so we’re all military

personnel we came from 23 different

nations surveillance fishing I’d

actually serve on the mission for 13

months it’s been seven months in Syria

during this last six months operating

out of Lebanon and I was right down in

southern Lebanon at the junction of the

three countries of Israel Lebanon and

Syria so it was a bit of a hotspot of

violence unfortunately still is right up

until today the Hezbollah operated out

of southern Lebanon and obviously you

know opposing force to to Israel so it

was it was a dangerous part of the world

any given day but the majority that 13

months it had been relative peace and

calm and in fact probably for about a

decade prior to the 2006 war it really

only been a number of times where every

six months or so there would be a small

skirmish across the border but the rest

was you know sort of relative calm

throughout that region but on the 12th

of July I was out commanding a patrol or

doing a patrol of the region just a

normal routine patrol we’d actually

spend about 12 hours a day patrolling

those regions and I was the only

Australian so the only woman in my my

team at patrol base key arm right at

this Junction and a normal everyday

patrol for us but then in an instance

there was a call came across the radio a

mayday call that there have been an

ambush on the border and that all

patrols were to return to their home

bases and I guess for me if I can drill

down into that split-second moment for

me I was driving the vehicle

I had a Lebanese interpreter

had a teammate also had fellow UN

peacekeepers from another team another

base and I’m having to now assess quite

quickly that there’s a massive change

there’s been an ambush where three

Israeli soldiers were killed two more

were captured and brought back into

Lebanon and literally within minutes of

this ambush there’s like just fighting

erupts rattle on that border and so in

that moment it’s knowing that within

minutes we’re going to start to see

rounds impacting around us and I in

control of the vehicle and in control of

this patrol I’m having to make some some

very critical decisions right now that

could affect our lives potentially and

so in that moment having to first of all

get composure get control of myself so I

can be an effective leader if I can

point something out to the audience

do ten chickens back when you said I’ve

got to get ready

you took a big bitch and I suspect

that’s that’s your first high-level

skill

yes and it’s instinctive but I cannot

it’s nice working with you a lab that

I’ve even noticed that I do these things

of having that awareness um but I guess

you know I would imagine most people in

the military would have that same

autonomic response as a result of

training I’m having to take that breath

almost push back and actually assess

what’s happening see what’s happening

around us so that we can make the right

decisions but then it’s about sort of

analyzing the options that I had at that

particular point yeah and where I was in

the town I did it have available to me

several options that could get me to the

patrol base I’m also looking about

what’s happening for me understand and

I’ve got a Lebanese interpreter in the

vehicle I’ve got my own team I’ve got

personnel from another team I’ve got an

enemy that I don’t know what’s going to

happen all these courses of action in

front of me different roads that there’s

a literal

and then they drop and pause in your eye

moods and you take a breath again and

stop it for a second and go wow can I

just quickly for the audience summarize

what I’m observing in both

linguistically and non-verbally and

because it’s fascinating to watch you

give this and with my understanding in

the brain I could explain to the group

what you doing in part at least with the

brain because when you win the Mayday

came in you straight away take a breath

now that’s the most important thing you

and I can do to improve thought this

equality of our thoughts is determined

by the amount of oxygen that’s in the

blood in the brain but blood water and

glucose and you’ve taken you haven’t got

access to water and glucose so you’ve

done your next best thing is to take

oxygen the moment you do that your brain

now has more capacity to attend to the

driver who’s next to you so you

explained away come out of self

awareness and readiness and you start

your brain extends and does inclusion so

the part of your brain dies affiliation

and relationship didn’t work in that

first few seconds once you had oxygen

your brain weight to the most important

individual to the person Dickstein could

interpret Nevada for you dry be yeah

once you’ve attended to that and you’ve

considered the other people involved so

you’ve attended the immediate

relationships your affiliating brain has

done that and that’s called parallel

processing and then you’re all of a

sudden you make a shift and you go well

I realize that there were various

options and did it and your hands are

starting to move which is the brain

process called quantum oscillating and

it means your unconscious mind all of a

sudden switches on and it says you’ve

got all these variables to think about

and then if the audience notice do you

then we need to and these were the

options and you started to digitize your

hand gestures so your brain pulled from

all those options one

the workable ones which means you back

to parallel processing and it’s pure

fewer textbook places and you can watch

it unfold continue your nonverbals in

the meeting you just breathe and hardly

moved the moment you started considering

others you just isolated in your eyes

with once he started considering all the

external variables your gestures went

all over and then once you started to

make decisions and choices about options

it all unpacked and my because this

whole day in this webinar will be

available for people afterwards to

review that would be good to people who

are watching live to get back and rerun

it and notice what I’m describing

afterwards because they look just

noticed your hands moving that they’re

living in very deliberate ways yes is

what your brain is doing and the moment

people start doing this sort of gesture

we know that they’re continuing multiple

options now many have you stating that

too long you have gone into overwhelm

and one of the questions I saw somewhere

in reading last night which how do I

stay out of overwhelm is when I consider

all the variables I picked the two or

three things that I can do yeah

beautiful example I think it’s what to

actually do make a decision

so with that decision-making process

that I went through which would have

happened in split seconds of analyzing

options thinking of the contingencies

because you don’t want to choose an

option and then find the enemy’s

intervened they’ve bombed that road and

you’re now stranded so you need to have

all those backup plans and contingencies

ready to go in that analysis process yes

but it’s also remaining in a flexible

mindset where I can keep making more

decisions not lock myself into this

decision because I don’t know what else

is going to happen

can only make a decision for right now

and it’s important to make a decision

because often the worst-case scenarios

would become immobilized with fear

you’ll become stagnant and make that

small step forward just to take one

decision because even if we make the

wrong decision

if we’re in that mindset momentum of

decision capacity we can then make

another decision to get back on track

change the direction going so long as

we’re able to keep moving forward

maybe I love you comment around you just

make a decision and the reason I think

that’s important

he said if I if I just don’t make the

decisions and I avoid it or death the

longer I stay out of the decision but

still keep running in my head the more

likely I am they went to fear and out

yeah

and fear and out if I percolated too

long will turn into worryin and worry

I’ll turn into anxiety and the the thing

I love about what you saying you giving

people permission to make a decision and

do something and do it as an experiment

as a trial and then adjust it afterwards

and learn from the doing rather than

learning or letting my beliefs or my

career and my choices

then it gets we were writing in a time

right now yeah very liberating and and I

think I think you said it a little

earlier around is getting caught in

getting things perfect and what you’re

essentially saying is don’t get pretty

little in fact not always going to be

perfect about that particular scenario

was just broken out there it’s a long

work perfect yeah so much perfect all I

can do is take control of the make

actions back my judgment and decision

and that

knowledge that I have and skill set I

have right then and there

hmm keep making decisions but also take

that pressure off then in part of the

problem is that we we give in to that

side of overwhelm and when you’re saying

one of the questions we’ve had is how do

we avoid that overwhelm and someone what

you described of not staying out of it

but thinking about it for too long just

make a decision and get that momentum

moving forward but I think also is just

take the pressure off we’re in a new

situation we’re in a situation when we

may not have trained for I mean even

that patient’s force we were there to

observe am I to the peace we weren’t

there as a force to be in the thick of

full scale with fighter jets bombing us

attack helicopters take fire you know

the full gamut of warfare was coming at

us and we’re unarmed these kids so even

for me I did pick up the coming unarmed

yeah you have that capacity to say

staggering things in simple ways and

yeah when when you tripped over that

comment about unarmed early violent

people miss that one or did they hear it

or do they think they got it wrong but

it’s a it’s a hard picture to make a

picture of somebody you know in the

middle of a war like that and seeing not

only a person and I’m but seeing a

blond-haired blue-eyed

person and I’m in that picture you’ve

got to work together yeah I think it’s

one of your fascinating wonderful traits

is your ability to describe

extraordinary things in really ordinary

but factual ways it’s a great

distinction particular time right now

yeah thank you know you could say sorry

that Cynara is a great analogy on a

couple of levels of you I was military

trained to be in a war zone but had all

my normal operating things taken away

from me as in a weapon but one in this

scenario that was unexpected

and if nothing’s we can kind of like

convert this now to what’s happening for

the general public is you know that made

a call coming across the radio alerting

us to things are very different now

and then seeing what was happening the

bombs coming in the explosions knowing

that we’re gonna have to change and

shift I think that’s what’s happening

for all of us we turned on the radio or

television or something a device we hear

an update on what the instructions are

so you’re in Tibet just do what we can

do now because there might be a new

arrival later in the day

exactly and with the war we didn’t know

how long this war would go for it was an

indefinite time frame and so it’s not

taking that mindset of going okay we

need to do what we can right now but we

need to be prepared to do this protect

tracted period of time yeah we just need

to keep showing up each moment no good

to get us through the next moment keep

having that capacity to go to wait till

the end of the war and no one knows how

long that’s going to be I’m just sitting

here wondering how many times you must

have said that was then this is now

yeah mostly doing next constantly it’s

now a good time for us to visit some of

the questions we’ve I think so I can see

we’ve got lots coming in on top of

literally hundreds that we really had

yes yeah my ode to the people listening

and watching and we truly we have we

must have over three or four hundred

questions now and many and I will

continue to process these and answer

them somehow we’ll get through as many

as we came in this webinar will click

them in during the day

but do keep sending them we will give

and plays an ongoing process yeah but I

won’t stop this one I think it’s a good

one for you Alan if you want to have a

tackle

I got tackling this one what are the

best techniques to assist with calming

others and let me do it it face to face

in non face to face and if I’m face to

face the most important things for me to

do is not be too direct

so never had my hips shoulders face

together and don’t close the space the

man that we close the space our loot

system switches on and our hearing

switches off so don’t move directly

toward as I’m doing to the camera now

I’m finding like they even deserts throw

camera I’m finding myself sitting back

is wanting to get back the private

biological system that you’re not safe

and unfortunately when somebody does

something we often go negative then to

that and at this time I go don’t close

the space and if you going to place the

space and people watching will have

noticed that 50% of the time I’m off

center and that’s to make sure that I’m

not tense

I’m not direct on and I’m not moving

forward once you get legs free right and

it’s called angle proximity and tension

once you get those I’m just

demonstrating now you can change your

height and direction so I’m now making

eye contact with you in the audience but

my hates face in Kenya that’s very

non-confrontational compared today it

feels I can feel it stayed away

the other thing is I won’t touch so it’s

a much softer with stance

I mean viewing and even you know we’re

all getting used to working now through

cameras and having meetings hum tips

through a screen it seems even see in

this experiment of doing this webinar

but it is more aggressive or Harsha

front on coming through experience

there’s nothing for us to remember and

the Knicks and their be invisible

signals the angle high proximity

direction tensioned levander learn to be

a balloon the tough all yeah and you’re

like this didn’t break eye contact

cuz that seemed to me sixty that I’m

thinking and allowed me to breathe so

every now and again pause and this how

do you breathe and look away and all

that many completely removes the tension

between us then you now become the

observer of me not the receiver of me to

have activated your visual cortex and

you’re now primarily seeing me as the

observer and if i block my voice then

couldn’t inquisitive funny and soften up

and slow it down

now if i want to be credible and not

seeing as we key i do soft once no me

and then you’ll get clear that i want

you to follow my instructions what it

meant as opposed to me being effable and

asking you to do that and if we can now

win to be credible until I went to be

affable manners where do you see if the

wonderful Michael

that’s a huge difference

and the question of do I ask or do a

tool these yeah the one about throwing

now those last bits around the voice at

five times more important when I’m on

telephone because you don’t have a

visual I don’t have thing in the visuals

and you don’t have to fish when I pause

and I look around like that you can see

me you falls away because you know I’m

thinking but the poisons need to be

shorter on the phone and the audience

will notice that as you say something

every time you finish a comment about

what you see so I always do linking so

you feel who so whenever one of my

golden rules is honor the contribution

and then all of the content and then add

to the content as most of us hear

somebody they got oh man what I think

about that is and I throw mine in

without letting you know that what you

said got register yeah yeah thank you

maybe be and we can do it a session

later in the experimental laboratory on

both phone conference calling you and

video conference calling and we’ll do

more of that but that’s there the key

beats the you think I’m on a telephone

we’re impossible we’re ahead City hands

are free because when you were

motionless and there were no hand

movement earlier but I pointed it out

the quality of your voice has one

characteristic once you started

identifying the other people you have

different words and then once you got

into the choosing the options

it was a precise shorter sharper voice

now those differences we hear on the

phone and react to without noticing them

so we now need to be more aware and not

operating in autopilot as much but God

we farm or consider wide open then we do

face to face fantastic well we’ve got a

lot bit more questions to roll through

it would you like me to ask you another

one or do you want it one name so to me

I’ve got one here that I’d like to throw

here giving you your extraordinary

background it’s how you choose leave

with men each and allow your own

vulnerability and where do and how do

you do that ok so look I think boner

abilities are really fascinating mmm any

piece and can be really powerful if used

it at the appropriate time I found

particularly for me as a woman

serving in a male-dominated work

environment pretty much my entire 15

year career in the Army I was the only

woman also the leader of an all-male

team and sewing having a leadership role

in those environments

I found that I always had to work really

hard in the trust and respect of my team

and prove my competence very quickly in

the shortest time frame possible and I

must acknowledge that during my career I

found that quite frustrating a little

bit unfair that my male counterparts

would be able to assume command and

automatically have that trust and

respect given by the rank that they

would bear on their shoulders and it

wasn’t they did something that lost that

trust and respect

whereas I felt I had to work really hard

to earn it in the first place it wasn’t

an environment where you could stand up

and go

time for agenda debate exactly exactly

and I didn’t have any female role models

in its ahead of me I was very thankful

for all the women that went before me

sort of enough cracks in the glass

ceiling to allow women and my generation

to do a number first in the IDF but I

didn’t have anyone that I could go and

ask for advice a female officer advice

so I had fantastic male commanders but

didn’t you know just nuances that they

wouldn’t have sort of really understood

or able to ask but you know it’s only in

hindsight now with enough distance from

my military career that I look back and

think what a blessing that was and a

gift for me because I I do really

believe that trust and respect is

something you earn particularly in these

industries and environments where you’re

literally wanting people to put their

lives in your hands and trust you to

make life-and-death decisions on their

behalf and then trust respect is

something you should should have to earn

not just see appointed to you with a a

job title a rank or a position so it’s

kind of hindsight that’s provided that

give to me so I think for me really

being important that I set that

credibility first before being able to

show honour ability but then once you

have that trust and respect yourself

capable maybe you can see me take a

break and be okay

we’ve lost many here for a moment and

I’d like to pick up what may be same and

combine or verify it by I mentioned

Michael window

yeah and Michael somebody I’ve studied

with for over 30 years and he talks

about the importance of establishing

credibility hmm to earn the right to be

vulnerable yes because many like you we

work in the corporate business world

where even though they say we’re gonna

be equal and equity and level playing

field it’s not it’s a high status game

and I add in I need to have the right

and the authority to I need a role but

says this is my role hmm they have the

authority now I can have authority

without credibility and I’m in trouble

yes then I believe it’s gonna be the IMC

yes and once I do the authority the

credibility I can mean do the rapport

which is the approachability and if you

receive me when I’m approached when I’m

approachable yeah and we connect I can

indeed garner ability that’s it that’s

how I’ve mapped it and tracked it yeah

baby the years now I always say to

people leadership is where you can

establish credibility team down

authority to ensure yep

can I get that credibility even though I

don’t have the role yeah

no responsibility all the authority and

once I have credibility now there are

some people in the world knew would be

one of them up that I would matter

Michael ring is another my dear friend

Cynthia Johnson’s another and who can go

straight into any circumstance and

create rapport without credibility

yes next and that’s a small place for

some of us it is not where everyone’s

going to be under this sort of pressure

that we’re dealing with it’s the most

gesture in the hardwood is to do the

poor rapport is where I can meet with

you and we share an experience an

empathy together and I think it’s a good

dog for us to sit our souls

yeah to experiment in you know and I

think rapport is it’s a a skill set that

takes a lot of time and experience and

and such a people you see someone who

has that ability to create rapport

anyway um if I could just touch very

briefly because I know we’re running out

of time right now as we always do my

thoughts on leadership – I actually see

everybody is a leader I think there’s a

lot of sudden leadership situations

where anyone can step up as a leader and

may find themselves having to step up as

a leader and well you were saying before

that you can tap you can create

credibility and be a leader leader

without the authority I think that’s

kind of an important point of us what I

very ring back when I sneeze attend

leader I’m actually referring to

everybody very quietly if I can allude

to some big international meetings that

I’ve run for me and certainly the most

challenging one with Garner and I had

460 world leaders from 192 countries in

the room I without any question or doubt

with the underling in that room that was

the lowest status person in the room and

no authority whatsoever but they invited

me because I had a history of getting

groups to agreement they beyond anybody

the room so that was one of those places

and because I had the credibility I

could forget credibility and moving to

rapport with them and because of that I

created a series of one-on-one phone

meetings with them and we had all those

casual chats and that was a place where

I could do before without the authority

and the rapport was allowed because of

my credibility hmm the interesting

mixture ya know and I’m gonna bring it

back to pyridine sometimes as a parent I

could think I’ve got the right I am the

parent and but it won’t necessarily give

me credibility on the form of the child

that that’s such great gifts and

knowledge we’ve um in the last minute

that we have I’m just wondering if I

could ask you if you had one or two or

three top tips that you could give

people know in today’s current

environment what what might that be

and probably what I just did stop

breathe and take the time to pause and

think and the next one is I haven’t

mentioned yet but pick up the pace of

the volume of the person’s voice that

you’re talking with and endeavoring to

talk a similar place and not have to get

me be because the bell maintance and

agitated you’ve got to speak quickly

give me but you mustn’t speak loudly

yeah so matching pace little volume with

oxygen we enjoy as always absolutely

pure gift thank you again for joining me

for this webinar Alan we still have

literally hundreds of unanswered

questions for all of you that have set

questions in Allen I will continue

answering those over the coming weeks

we’re going to so don’t feel like that

they’ve been lost and we’ll send them

out from the websites come in

conversations calm thank you so much

thank you but we’re out of time guys but

continue saying those questions in

Illinois we’ll continue answering them

and we look forward to catching up with

you on the next webinar stay tuned thank

you

Fantastic we’ve got quite a few people on but I think they’ll trickle through sort of in the first five minutes which happens just as people kind of get their internet connections up and running so this the lovely to see everybody’s faces and we hope that everyone’s been keeping healthy and happy during these crazy covent times it’s been awesome to get updates from everyone in slack to see how everyone’s adjusting and Helen’s provided some wonderful ideas and content to kind of keep us all stimulated in creative during this time.

I’m really looking forward to the session this evening not just because we’ve got a very inspiring individual joining us but also because the content is very relevant in this current landscape so the purpose of the session today goes beyond inspiration alone it’s also designed to help you navigate decision making and mattina will be taking us through decision-making the decision-making component from her leadership in action online program and you’ll also be sharing some practical frameworks that you can apply beyond the workshop in your everyday lives so I’d like to formally introduce major Matina jewel mattina grew up in the hinterland of Byron Bay and joined the army at age of 17 during her 15 military career 15 year at Matilda sorry let’s try that again during your 15 year military career mattina served on five missions and earned nine military and war medals she’s the only Australian to receive two Republic of Lebanon War medals for acts of bravery on the battlefield and being wounded in combats

she completed the physically demanding

Navy divers course served with the

American Navy SEALs tracked down

warlords in the Solomon Islands

fast roped from helicopters and forded    

smuggler ships in the Arabian Gulf and

was posted as a peacekeeper with the

United Nations in Syria and Lebanon

medically retired mattina served on the

prime-minister Advisory Council and

continues to champion change for our

injured veterans among her many honorary

honorary roles

is a founding our best of the projects

thankful a movement partnered with the

United Nations to help empower women and

children globally

mattina has been featured on the ABCs

Australian story which he all received

the link to on slack so hope you

hopefully you’ve watched it but if you

haven’t you can watch it back obviously

after this session and she is a

best-selling author and her life story

has been an option for a global feature

film which is amazing maintaining you’ve

been extremely generous in leading this

session for us today and we’re really

grateful to have the opportunity to hear

your insights on leadership and

resilience from some of the toughest

environments and I’m very excited for

the session today and I know that the

media string is Aitu so thank you and

without further ado please welcome

Matina Jewell thanks thanks thanks so

much for that very kind introduction and

thank you for having me in your home’s

on a Wednesday night Wednesday afternoon

depending where you’re located around

Australia I thought so given that some

of you have seen me give a keynote

previously and but I know many of your

audience

sending haven’t haven’t seen that

element or may not know much about me at

all but we want to just kick off with

giving a little sort of piece of the

background come on as quick as possible

kind of get you a little bit across my

background story particularly my service

with United Nations a peacekeeper in

Lebanon during the 2006 Lebanon War I’m

just going to show you a really quick

video that will kind of set the scene

for this evening which is where I take a

lot of my decision-making tools and my

experiences from is from my military

career and particularly that more so but

those that haven’t seen it this is kind

of a highlights from a keynote speaking

and the members of the audience who have

seen me speak this probably you know

kicks out some memories hopefully from

that session that you saw me up

depending how long ago that was so let

me does I’m going to share my screen so

you can actually see that video

[Music]

[Music]

there’s a bit of a shrapnel and the

blast on the the rocket hitting a

position I should came over the platform

here I’m standing now

I worked damn hard to get to where I was

and I had a fantastic future ahead of me

in the army but in a split second all of

that was gone and I had no say in that

decision there were just so many times

where I really really should have died

what started out as a normal and as a

routine day as a peacekeeper with the

United Nations on the border of Israel

and Lebanon turned into the most

dangerous leadership challenge of my

entire life

I was tasked to command a convoy of UN

vehicles they had roads destroyed by

bombs my movements were restricted by

land mines

but I knew that my decisions would

directly impact on the lives of those 16

soldiers that I was responsible for but

you know sometimes as leaders we have to

be able to just think outside the box

it takes leaders who are courageous who

have the vision to take an organization

in a direction but they may not be a

hundred percent sure about how things

will look on the other side I do really

believe that out of periods have changed

even out of great adversity can come

incredible opportunities so long as we

have the courage to pursue them

[Music]

you

okay so hopefully that kind of excuse

you a little snapshot into a bit of my

background and some of the lessons I’ll

be drawing on this evening and when we

start talking specifically around

decision-making risk management in sort

of crisis situations so I thought we

might start first of all by explain a

little bit about the online program are

we taking this workshop from this

evening and I believes it because any

stage you’ve got questions as we go

don’t hesitate to jump in ask questions

use the chat or unmute if you need to

just jump in and ask a question and at

the end of the session after we’ve gone

through the decision-making module

there’ll be plenty of time for for Q&A

and know lots of you’ve already said it

we’ve got lots lots of questions already

but there’s opportunity to ask at any

stage as we go along this is you know a

friendly environment it’s supposed to be

free-flowing and interactive with you

guys

so maybe just a little bit about the the

online program so I’ve just launched my

leadership in action program now when I

think if leaders actually think of every

single person in an organization and I

think the problem is that many of us

myself included there are times where

unless it’s explicit that your task as a

leader is in your job title or it’s

quite explicit in your roles and

responsibilities sometimes we don’t

think that leadership is for all of us

and I think that’s a mindset shift that

we want in any organizations we want

leaders at every single layer of our

organizations to be as effective as we

possibly can to have that leadership at

every layer of the business and so this

is really a whole program that’s

designed not just for your you know

senior leaders it’s for anyone

regardless of your stage of the

leadership journey and there’s six

modules involved in the program first it

starts with sudden leadership and I

think you know as I have the opportunity

particularly my keynote speaking I get

to speak of organizations all around the

world and from all different industries

one of the things I’m seeing more and

more is that this sudden leadership

component where people either

technically skill get advanced so high

in the organization

they suddenly inherit leadership

responsibilities and don’t necessarily

have the time to have been trained at a

junior stage of their career so it’s

sort of they suddenly throne upon them

and also through my career I’ve had

these experiences where it’s completely

throwing the deep end and and called

upon to step up and lead and I think for

most of us in any job any environment

that we’re in there are stages in our

careers where we do have to step up and

lead and so this is something that helps

leaders of creeped-out people to take

those opportunities and for all of us to

kind of seek out more leadership

responsibilities even if it’s not part

of our daily responsibilities the second

component is delegation and there’s some

some really effective frameworks that

I’ve had so many organizations said it’s

a really great tool that comes with that

particular module the third one is

communication I think communication is

such a critical leadership skill with we

need to be crystal clear in our

communication and we don’t have clarity

about communication that’s when so many

things go wrong and I think clarity of

the communication that’s happening right

now through the media in terms of what

we’re dealing with encoded things of

different rules that are happening

between different states create a lot of

communication and sorry a lot of

confusion within the community due to

the fact that clarity of the

communication isn’t happening

effectively the fourth thumb module is

on connection and how we need to connect

with our people a really deep level to

understand their strengths their

weaknesses assigning the right people

right job right time and how as Lee as

we get that rapport and build that trust

and respect both up and down our

organizations the fifth module is

decision-making which is what we’re

covering this evening so I won’t I’ll

leave that’s going to a little bit more

and the final the sixth module in that

entire package kit is around dutiful

leadership it’s something that I’ve

created across my career where I’ve

combined a number of different

leadership stars together which I call

dutiful leadership it sort of is

underpinned by servant leadership where

I see myself as a leader serving my team

I’ve always operated as a

inclusive leader but I think the third

component that this is really important

particularly in encourage times is

adaptive leadership and how as leaders

we need to be able to transition and

shift our SAR our style of leadership

depending on the scenario and facing

with this time we might need to do that

point swiftly and the only way we can

transition and bring our teams with us

if we’re changing those Styles is if we

weren’t that trust and respect from our

team and that whole packet is called

dutiful leadership and the honor of

leading click on gives you a little bit

of oversight of the package how each of

the modules is set out is that they

start with a video of me talking about

my experience of that particular topic

so if I’m talking about sudden

leadership there’ll be a video that I

talk about an interaction I had with a

warlord in the Solomon Islands on one of

my five missions so there’s a kind of an

extreme story that goes with that bless

and I pull those points out and then

those points have developed in the

workbook that suits with each of the

modules and the workbook will contain a

number of different types of tools or

frameworks for that particular

leadership skill and it also provides

activities for you to embed and hone

those skills because we only really

develop and become efficient at using

those skills the more we practice using

them it’s like any school skill you know

the more we do it the more we feel

confident in our ability to use that

skill set so that’s how the workbooks

sit alongside the videos of each of

those modules

hopefully that’s crystal clear video

workbook there is it’s all online so

basically you can do it on whether

you’re doing a computer a different type

of device a mobile device there’s

actually tires it can have your mobile

phones you can go to the whole program

very quickly and you can enter in and

change all your responses to the

questions all online but there is also

workbooks that set off it that you can

actually download yourself and write in

those workbooks in the pages if you

prefer to be a bit old-school like

myself and numbers

like you know frameworks and cards that

go with those packs as well so so

tonight though we’re going to sort of

just break into the decision-making

module which is we’ve put out as part of

the launch of the program the entire

module is free feed about to go on and

to access the video and to use the tools

and because I and I think your

decision-making something we’re all

struggling with right now given the

current circumstances with Coburg has

made you know different situations for

so many people around the world and I

think it’s you know creating for us

uncertainty and having to make decisions

around our business now lives with this

current situation so I wanted to kind of

help you get the most out of that module

by workshopping that live with you

tonight so what I thought they might do

to start that to sort of set the scene

again I’ve shared the video with you

from that actual module it goes for a

few minutes so so settling for that and

and then we’ll come back on more talk

through that particular module so I’m

just going to share screen again

[Music]

I believe that one of our most important

and challenging functions as a leader is

decision-making and the accountability

and responsibility that goes with making

those decisions decision-making is not

easy there are risks associated with

nearly every single decision we make be

it in our work or in our life in general

and these risks can be confusing

stressful frightening and even

paralyzing in the military we spend a

lot of our time on decision making and

the decisions we make not only affect

outcomes they can impact life and death

and often we don’t have much time to

make them so I want to tell you about

one of the toughest decisions I had to

make during my military career I was

serving as a peacekeeper with the United

Nations in Lebanon during the 2006

israel-lebanon war having sustained many

near misses at my tiny UN post patrol

base key arm I was tasked to command a

convoy of two UN armored personnel

carriers and 16 Indian and Ghanaian

infantry soldiers from key armed to our

UN headquarters in the coastal town of

tear at the last minute I was also given

the responsibility of navigation for the

convoy now the transit from kion to T

would normally take you about two hours

to complete but we are now in a war zone

and all the roads that could get me to

you they paralleled the border where all

the fighting was most intense Israel was

actually pushing through into southern

Lebanon and the battle on that border

region between the two countries was

ferocious and because of this it took me

over two days to get my convoy through

with near misses from bombs and rockets

from both sides of the war I had spent

two days desperately trying to find a

road that hadn’t been bombed and would

allow me to reach the headquarters

having exhausted all the roads of my UN

provided map with no success I was able

to gain directions from a Lebanese

police officer to cut through banana

plantation using a dirt road that wasn’t

marked on my UN map

the only problem was that we would

normally not use dirt roads do the risk

of landmines in southern Lebanon but

this was not a normal situation and I

decided it was a risk worth taking that

dirt road did get me to the northern

outskirts of the city of tear

headquarters like had southern side of

the city I just had to get the convoy

through the city itself so that we could

reach the relative safety of a UN

compound during this war but that was

until I received information from my

headquarters that Israel was about to

hit the city with the largest air strike

of the war bad news yes but it got worse

the road I was on was due to be targeted

by the Israeli fighter jets and those

jets were already in the air they’re

inbound on their bombing runs and I was

told to expect to see bombs explode

around me at any given moment so in view

of they had a tough day in the office

well this was shaping up to be a tough

day now for me and I was having to make

some very significant decisions

high-risk decisions and I was the

commander of this convoy which meant I

was making decisions that I knew would

not only impact on my life but my

decisions would directly impact in the

lives of the 16 soldiers I was

responsible for and this made my

decision risk and responsibility process

just that little bit harder to go

through now having mentally gone through

my processes as quickly as I could I

assess my options and I really only had

to turn around return back to key arm or

just continue pushing on for that

headquarters in tear tear was by far the

better of those two choices but in the

back of my mind I knew that regardless

of the destination the decision that I

went with so long as I could show and

demonstrate a logical rational thought

process in having arrived at that

decision then I would have the full

backing and support of my hierarchy now

I think this is a very important point

in leaders for organizations where we’re

wanting people to manage risk if we

don’t give them our full support they

will become risk of

afraid of making the wrong call and

they’ll constantly push all the

decisions to higher levels which creates

time delays and a lot of frustration if

we want to avoid that process it’s up to

us as leaders to create cultures in our

business that do fully support and

empower people in the decision-making

process we must help them manage risk so

that they can be decisive if we can our

people will feel more effective and are

able to take action which in turn makes

our organization more responsive and

nimble rather than choked with time

delays when it comes to decisions and

taking action in Lebanon I use the

decision-making tool that I have

developed and found to be effective in

both split-second decisions as well as

longer-term decision processes a process

that can assist in arriving at the right

decision in brief my decision-making

tool involves assessing the pros and

cons of each option at hand then

reviewing each of the following aspects

to the decision your training your

skills previous experiences gut instinct

or intuition other support available the

time you have to make decisions which

will in turn determine how much advice

or input you can obtain from your

superiors and your team thankfully my

decision in Lebanon to push on for the

headquarters turned out to be the right

call we eventually arrived at the UN

compound and survived the journey it was

the right decision even though I arrived

with my back broken in five places and

internal injuries after being thrown

into the bulletproof windscreen of my

armored vehicle well it was making

evasive maneuvers I was severely injured

but although my injuries were so severe

that my military career was over I would

be medically retired from the army at

least I was alive something I and the

people I was leading may not have been

had I made the other call to return two

key armed because tragically the base

that we would have returned to was

destroyed by fighter jets just days

later killing all the peacekeepers

in the base my teammates my friends it

wasn’t easy

leadership seldom is but remember you

must create a culture that empowers

people to be able to make decisions in

the army we need soldiers to be decisive

and we have a saying that corporals not

generals run the army and this is

because corporals are at the first level

of leadership in the army they are on

the front line leading private soldiers

the generals are responsible for the

strategic level thinking and planning

but the power to act needs to come right

down to the soldiers carrying out the

commands for this to happen in the Army

we are able to push down decision making

to the lower ranks but the

responsibility and accountability for

those decisions it still remains with

the higher levels of command and this

means that you need to have the trust in

your people and also ensure they are

equipped resourced and skilled enough to

make these decisions as you as the

leader are also share the responsibility

it’s a different way of decision-making

from what I’ve experienced in the

corporate sector and it’s worth

exploring to see if it would improve the

way your business operates imagine if in

your workplace that decisions could be

pushed down which would make processes

quicker but accountability to your

customers and shareholders would remain

at the leadership level it is something

worth thinking about and exploring in

every industry

so now to your workbook where you’ll

have the opportunity to work through the

decision-making tool it’s a good one

which works for both quick and

longer-term decisions and I hope you

practice it and find it as powerful as

it has been for me in making some of the

toughest decisions that I’ve ever faced

[Music]

okay so that just kind of gives you a

bit of a taste into how the videos work

in the online program and also to kind

of set the scene for the decision making

activities that sit off that program I

thought tonight given we’re going to go

too short a little bit of time together

and I want to leave as much time as I

possibly can to take Q&A to answer any

questions that you might have I’m only

going to go through one of the the tools

in the workbook which is the actions on

decision-making framework that I’ve

created that I use in both quick quick

split-second decisions and also in those

long-term decision-making and so I’m

gonna jump in and take you through that

but I thought I might just pause and to

see if there’s any questions that you’ve

got after that video that you just can’t

wait til the Q&A part I just need to ask

right the house so if you do just turn

your mic on and just ask a question

otherwise I’ll jump straight into the

framework happy okay all right so again

I’m going to share my screen and bring

up the decision-making framework will

quickly work through each of the

components of that and again I’ve sent

that out to you so you can download and

have that tool to use ongoing and it’s

also part of that free trial and in the

workbook you get to run a whole lot of

activities to actually work through each

of those components but I’ll share

screen now to bring up the framework and

hopefully this will make some sense as I

talk talk us through it just enlarge

that for you a little bit okay

right so on your screen you’ll see that

there’s there’s basically seven

components to the framework and it’s

divided into like two parts so the part

one is the exploration stage of

decision-making and part two is you know

as I’ve titled their so they’re making

it happen actually making those

decisions and moving forward so we start

at the top we’ve defined the problem

which is the first part of the

decision-making framework and it’s at

this point that you want to really ask

all the questions do you really

understand all the key components of the

issue that you’ve got to make a decision

on have you got stakeholder interest

have you asked those questions that we

need to ask and importantly have we

asked the right question I think

sometimes the problems with our

decision-making is we get it wrong right

from the beginning we just jump in and

make a decision without asking questions

and in particular we don’t ask the right

questions of the right people involved

in the situation so that’s the first

part of the process we then jump if

you’re going on sort of clockwise around

the around the model you’re going to

part two which is the brainstorming

solutions and in this part I think we

rush this component often in our

decision-making it’s an opportunity to

really kind of do blue sky thinking just

throw up every single idea before we

just disregard and move forward with the

decision it’s also the stage that where

we often get this component wrong is

where we don’t ask questions or involve

we’ll get solutions to the decision from

both above and below where we sit

wherever it is in your organization so

this is the stage where you want to ask

your team for input into the decision to

come up with solutions that they think

and we ourselves may not have thought of

and we also want to get that input from

higher levels of our organizations we

then move into stage three which is

collate collate and refine those

solutions that we’ve come to from that

so blue sky thinking and it’s also an

opportunity where we can add in any

alternative solutions

I’ve found it’s really useful at this

stage to get quite visual in this

activity so for me I really like to put

all the decisions out in front of me

whether that’s just putting them down on

paper whether it’s using a whiteboard

flip chart getting it up in front of me

so I can actually see all the options

that I have available before I start

refining down it’s also a part of this

stages I’ll see your gut intuition comes

in I find that in stage 3 is where my

gut instinct will tell me which parts of

those options that I’ve got that aren’t

applicable aren’t going to work so it’s

the stage you want to really listen and

check in with your gut response and it’s

also a time where you might want to ask

higher level if you need top cover for

the decision that you’ve got at hand the

next three steps so stage four five and

six are really what I think of the three

critical components of decision making

so these are the ones that I really want

you to to pay attention to and to check

in on so the first of those three which

is stage 4 which is the risk factors and

contingencies it’s really where you’re

looking at the pros and cons of each of

the options that you’ve refined down

it’s where at this stage of the

problem-solving that you want to define

any of the key risks that you might have

involved develop appropriate sort of

contingency plans for each of those key

risks that you may have it’s also where

you want to check in with your training

your skills the resources to make sure

you’ve got the resources to carry out

any of those options that you’re

thinking of going with and a really key

component of this part is is the time

factor so that situation I described in

the video in Lebanon one of the main

limiting factors of my decision-making

was in this component and that was time

to make that decision I literally had a

life-and-death decision to make with no

time to really analyze

the situation I was in I just had to

make a decision so this one is where the

time factor will really contribute to

how you move forward the decision-making

so if you’ve got more time then you can

expand on your decision-making okay so

going into stage five take

responsibility this is that actually

probably the key components of this

entire process and it’s the one that

often gets missed and I think a lot of

companies wouldn’t get themselves into

trouble if we paid more attention on

their on taking responsibility it’s here

where while we’re making the decision if

we’ve chosen one of those options to go

with where we need to take

responsibility for the decision we’re

about to make and as I said often this

is the stage that gets overlooked and

we’re not comfortable to take the

responsibility of the decision it’s

probably an indication that maybe we

need to do it more work we’re not

comfortable the decision we need to go

back potentially to the start stage six

is decide and take action and you know

commit to the action you’re going to

take and actually can kind of back

yourself in that decision that you’ve

actually logically gone through a

process to come to that point you’ve

taken responsibility so really back

yourself and going forward with the

decision and then of course some stage

seven is repeat and course correct again

another component we sometimes overlook

and it’s quite helpful for people to

really understand that step of the

decision-making process particularly

people who find it difficult to take

action to make that decision is that

there’s another stage where you can

course correct that stage seven if it’s

completely the wrong decision well then

you can just simply go back and start

the process again and make another

decision so that’s kind of a real quick

snapshot of the model and I’m going to

stop sharing screen so you can actually

see me again and before we go into open

Q&A I’m happy to take any questions that

you might have just with the with that

decision-making model itself if you’ve

got any comments any feedback any

questions with how it works

otherwise you download the the free

module and you actually go through the

workbook

have more time to kind of analyze and

use it for yourself in any decisions

that you might be faced with at the

moment anyone got any questions from

that from that tool okay there’s no

questions now if you think of something

later in relation to that

decision-making framework then by all

means you haven’t missed the chance of a

half an hour or so left I’m not going to

hand back to Beck who can facilitate the

Q&A with us so you can ask me any

questions at all in terms of what we’ve

covered tonight or anything that even

goes outside those boundaries

thanks so much material that was amazing

and I think what we really wanted to do

with these sessions is offer you guys

something tangible as well as having the

opportunity to talk to someone like we

will engage in now directly with mattina

so that you’ve got some frameworks and

whilst you know a lot of people within

this network don’t necessarily work in

big organizations as mattina said at the

beginning you know leadership is not

just PI prime ministers and politicians

and executives in those organizations

it’s every single person in their daily

life within their family unit and in

their community and certainly every

single one of you are leaders so I

really encourage you to consider how

leadership applies within your own life

even if you’re not a leader within a

title or in an organization we’ll start

with a couple of questions that came

through in the pre-registration and then

like mattina said if you’ve got anything

that’s jumped up during the session to

this point just probably in chat and

will facilitate the session and the

questions as they come through I’ve been

getting quite a few messages that

Internet’s been a bit sketchy and some

people have dropped in and out so I

really hope that you can find a way to

connect back but this will be available

to everyone if you do happen to fall out

you can watch it back later so the first

question that we’ve got and it’s a

really good one is how do you avoid

overthinking big decisions mmm

yeah great question and you know I think

a lot of us if we’ve got that time back

down then if we’ve got the luxury of

and then we tend to to take up as much

time as we got to overthink things for

me a lot of a lot of the situation I’ve

been in read those big decisions have

actually been in a crisis situation and

that time factor has been a luxury I

simply didn’t have so in those

environments where it is really critical

and a crisis I found that a decision is

better than no decision that it gets to

those points and if we use that scenario

that I talked about in the video of

commanding that convoys you know what I

mean this sort of crossroads of having

to make a decision do I push on for the

headquarters or return back to key arm

you know absolute worst thing I could

have done at that moment as a leader of

that convoy was to become immobilized

with the fear of that decision and

becoming capable of making a decision

and if we become stagnant and I’ve been

talking my keynotes around momentum in a

decision capacity so I found in those

kind of crisis situation is really

critical you just make a decision and

the reason why it’s critical to make one

decision is it keeps you moving forward

if you become immobilized and you stop

making decisions

it’s then really hard to make that first

big decision to actually move forward

whereas if you can kind of break it down

keep making those decisions had done

momentum moving forward even if you make

the wrong decision and you go off track

and you realize you’ve made the wrong

call you can quickly make another

decision to get you back on track and

keep moving forward

faster and in a more nimble sort of

environment than if you have stopped

making decisions so one of the

suggestions I have is keep making

decisions if we’re making decisions we

can be you know moving readjusting and

even Freight the wrong decisions we can

get back on track faster the other part

of it I think you only do have that time

to analyze and go through so I I also

had that situation in Lebanon where I

did ask for a guidance from my from the

UN commands and of which there was two

commands operating in Lebanon all the

time to UN forces and of course I’ve got

conflicting advice I’m one of the UN

forces said

return to Kyong and the other director

made that my best chance of survival was

to push along to the headquarters and so

that left me as the commander on the

ground you know with the responsibility

that decision fairly on my shoulders I

was the only person who could make that

decision but I knew that a decision was

was what I had to do to keep moving

forward so if you do have that time

factor on your side and you’re getting

that advice from different areas

sometimes it’s useful if you put a time

limit on your decision to speed up the

process so that you don’t just end up

sitting I’m spinning your wheels

spending lots of time not actually

getting anywhere and meanwhile the rest

of the your competitors I’m moving

forward

another component I think is you know

often an 80% solution acted really

quickly is better than waiting till

you’ve got the hundred percent solution

answer and then you miss miss the boat

whatever else is ahead of you so so

sometimes we need to make decisions with

limited amount of knowledge limited

amount of of the future but again if

we’ve got that momentum in our decision

capacity then we can keep making

decisions to adjust I loved seeing your

little daughter in the background so

yeah I hope we’re there a couple of um

techniques you can use in order to not

become stagnant indecision capacity and

and the number one take out of that is

keep making decisions a decision is

better than no decision the next

question that we’ve got is I’m actually

one that was repeated a little bit was

how or there was this theme of fear and

how we overcome fear and uncertainty to

push to push ourselves to take action

some kind of action yeah absolutely and

I think here from my experiences on

battlefields around the world there is a

huge amount of uncertainty and also fear

so if I look at those two components

maybe I separate them out so you know

uncertainty is something else I think a

lot of us are feeling right now in the

global situation of what’s happening

with kobir that kind of correlates to

the battle

where you know when when a war starts we

don’t know how long the Wars going to go

for and so this is uncertainty of how

much in fact there’s a lot of things you

can’t control on the battlefield and so

there’s and the same in life there’s

lots of components that you can’t

control and that creates a whole lot of

uncertainty so I think it’s about

focusing on the things that you can

control the things that you do have

available to you that you can actually

make decisions on also identifying and

understanding the bits that are

uncertain kind of your wargaming and

looking at what the options are and what

might happen in each of those scenarios

plan for worst-case plan for best-case

and also have obviously the flexibility

to respond if firm scenario is said that

no one’s even thought of like home it

could occur that you’re flexible enough

to adapt and succeed with that scenario

occurs that no one’s thought of so it’s

about you know managing what you can

focusing on the scripts that you can’t

control and then the second component of

that question about the fear you know

fear is a natural response and I think

for me certainly in the war zones that

I’ve served in fear is a very real

component of the work that I was

involved in and there’s no quite kind of

trying to say you don’t you don’t want

to feel fear because it’s actually a

natural response I think we need to kind

of sit with that emotion and accept that

we’re gonna have fear but if we can sit

with it accept it rather than fighting

us and almost kind of put that emotion

aside so that we can remain in that

decision-making capacity can keep

momentum in our decisions moving forward

then we’re in the best situation so

almost like emotionally separating

ourselves from the situation the

decisions that we have at hand so that

we can focus on the logical rational

responses that we want to take in that

situation but again some the military is

is very effective in terms of training

us to be able to continue operating in

the face of fear and if I look at my 15

year career the majority of that career

was sort of thrown

deep and I was put in situations where I

was placed under extreme pressure and

having to make decisions to keep people

alive or to to win the mission to

actually succeed at what we’re trying to

do so there’s a lot of pressure put in

those environments and and you’re often

putting these people situations I think

if I look at one of the scenarios

certainly one of the earlier missions in

my career straight up to September 11th

I was actually on a navy ship and I was

sent over to the Middle East and we’re

actually working with the American Navy

SEALs and during that mission I was

required to learn to fast ragams were

boarding smuggler ships in the North

Arabian Gulf and faster in fact the

little snippet I’ve played right the

start that sort of this the Shiro from

the keynotes showed a little bit of

footage of me kind of it looks like

rappelling out of a helicopter but it’s

rappelling with no safety equipment so

there’s no rappelling harness there’s no

safety gear there’s no big net that will

break before view you know stuff that

one up but you simply you’re jumping out

of a helicopter with your hands and feet

on this rope dressed in body armor

about to board a smuggler ship and and

you just use your hands and feet to

control a really rapid descent down to

the ground onto the watercraft and it’s

normally because of the safety

considerations that activity is normally

not even done by US Special Forces

soldiers in Australian Army so for me as

a female logistics officer I never

expected to be asked to do during my

career and it actually required the

Chief of Defence Force to sign a waiver

to allow me to do this on operations and

and of course you know there was this

whole physical component to have that

strength endurance to hold myself on

this broke leaping on to smuggle ships

and out of a helicopter but for me the

biggest problem was that I’m terrified

of chance and sorry I didn’t want to do

this activity at all let alone be leader

of the assault team and you know have a

whole team looking at me to lead them

into this you know uncertain situations

not knowing what would happen from those

once we wanted them and so I guess that

was just an amazing experience for me to

have to overcome my own fear of heights

in that situations and learned a fast

rope to really I guess push myself

outside my comfort zones and go from

that situation

I actually took away that it’s actually

from those environments where we are now

really challenged and we are pushed

through our fear factor that we actually

had the opportunity to learn the most in

life and and I’ve kind of taken that

forward with me and I really drew on

that element of knowing that I could do

something I was completely terrified of

and I still am terrified of heights I

know that I can faster I’ve got

helicopters all used to a previous life

but I still haven’t had that very you

know genuine fear of heights even now so

I know that from that experience I can

push myself through those situations and

then use that on the battlefield to

continue operating in what was a

terrifying situation where I as a leader

with people’s lives in my hand I had to

keep making decisions and I had to be

able to kind of come compartmentalize

that feedback down and try and remove

that emotion from me as the leader so

that I could keep making those decisions

to stay alive so that is extraordinary

Wow and I am also very scared of heights

there’s no way I would ever jump out of

a helicopter so I very much respect your

ability to overcome a fear material this

is a really interesting question as well

someone has asked how does leadership in

military with its clearly defined chain

of command compare with leadership in

the civilian world mmm yeah great

question never asked that really good

question um I think you know probably

touch them a little bit in the video

package and something that I’ve seen

across industries and I see is the

biggest difference between military and

other organizations regardless of what

those industries are is that I really

see this three factors in terms of

decision-making it’s it’s the decision

to risk management and it’s also the

responsibility aspect and I think it’s

really key is that responsibility aspect

often I see kind of gets overlooked

particularly in the in the corporate

world there’s companies that I’ve worked

with and the big difference that we have

in the military is that we empower

people right down to those lower levels

down to as I mentioned in the video

package that corporals are the first

level of leadership and Cook was run the

are be not the generals and the generals

come with a strategic level of thinking

if you watch the bloopers reel from that

video it’s all not online program I have

about ten attempts the same strategic

you’ll come up with that high level

thinking and planning but it’s actually

the court wasn’t our soldiers and our

and our young officers that go out and

implement those those plans and so in

order to have you know the strain

Defense Force were actually quite a

small Defence Force compared to most

countries in the world in terms of the

number of personnel we have so we have

really highly trained multi skills

people a lot of our soldiers have

university degrees very highly level

training so we get to empower our people

in decision-making

right down to that frontline level

whereas a lot of countries around the

world will only let the officers make

decisions and so the difference for us

is that in order for us to be effective

as a small fighting force we need the

guys right on that frontline to be able

to make decisions make them quickly make

them themselves empower them to make

those decisions because we just don’t

simply have the people to have the extra

layers of leadership sitting over the

top of them so the difference I’ve seen

there between business thinking and the

military particularly around that

responsibility is that as an officer can

can get my soldiers to carry out an

activity they will be responsible but so

to reline and I think if you’ve got that

responsibility aspect of the decisions

being made particularly that you’re

going to have them

prior to make those decisions without

necessarily your involvement then you’ve

got to build a really really strong

trust and respect rapport there knowing

that the people are making decisions

that you’re going to be implicated with

as well so it’s it’s that responsibility

piece that I think is a really big

difference between defense Australian

events and and business and it’s one of

those things that when I’ve worked with

different organizations if they can kind

of you know try and use some of that

thinking and actually leave guides a lot

of their problems in terms of that

responsibility piece of decision-making

and it empowers the entire organizations

where people can make those decisions

particularly it comes to life-saving

decisions where time is that big factor

if people aren’t in how to make the

decision or are afraid of making the

wrong decision then that time delay

creeps in it makes it makes

organizations I’ve seen so many

businesses that actually hamstrung by

their own internal process because

people aren’t allowed to manage risk and

make a decision yeah so yeah that’s um

that’s the biggest difference I say

between the two organizations mmm that’s

very helpful and I loved the concept and

you know empowering everyone to be

decision-makers as opposed to it just

sort of coming from the top down so this

is a really interesting question which

takes us out of decision-making for a

second but someone’s asked how can we

better look after returning servicemen

and women yeah oh look I’ve spent a lot

of time since I returned from Lebanon

and since losing my career with my

injury so I spent a year in a spinal

brace

I actually fractured and crushed five

vertebrae at a number of internal

injuries so I was medically retired from

the Army but I went on to be an adviser

to our Australian Prime Minister and on

defence and veteran issues said on the

national mental health board so mental

health is a really big aspect to me the

ends up centenary Commission I’m still

an advisor with the suicide prevention

Commission because unfortunately with

our veteran community we have a huge

problem with the suicide

rates of our personnel back here at home

in fact we’re losing more people at home

than we have battlefields from them

taking their own life’s when they come

back from being in operations

and I think you know as a community as a

public wanting to support and look after

our veterans a lot of its just that

recognition piece and to be honest I’m

really you know thankfulness that I’m

gonna it was my heart to see over the

last few years on Anzac Day I’ve had so

many people coming up and just saying

thank you for your service

complete strangers the you know I don’t

know about or even you know from my

keynote presentations I’ll often have

people afterwards saying you know thank

you for what you’ve done for our country

and that’s just been a ship direct and

I’ve seen the last sort of five years or

so for most veterans it’s it’s not it’s

not entitlements or money or those types

of things it’s just sort of you know

being recognized for what they’ve done

for our country so that’s one thing the

mental health is a really big aspect

across our communities but particularly

for our veterans I think oh you can’t

see the things that we’ve been exposed

to and we put a lot of responsibility on

quite young shoulders of our men and

women that we send off on operations

overseas and and the majority you know

do our country very proud and act in a

very honorable way we really need to

support and look after them when they

come home particularly from that mental

health healing aspect we’ve tried to

learn a lot from our allies from a

particular from Canada and the UK and

America on how we can better look after

our service personnel but you know if

you’re in contact with any veterans you

know ask them about their service and

thank them for their service is probably

just the smallest but the most

significant thing we can do and just

check in and see how they are thank you

moving on to another question so we can

get through as many as possible and

someone’s asked here what strategies

does mattina

undertake to ensure that she maintains

her body and mind in an optimal state to

make the best decisions she can right

exactly another good question um

it’s really important there’s there’s

lots of aspects of probably I’m just

conscious of time I’ve been fed a lot of

time talking about this question alone

but there’s things like sleep sleep is

so important and I’ve got two little

girls and a 5×7 home asleep deprived my

sleep I’m still really craving that

sleeps a big factor in order for us to

perform well and so get as much sleep as

we possibly can

I think when it comes to being in crisis

situations we don’t need to be what we

call combat-ready all the time so when

you can rest your people rest yourself

do that so in the military when we’ve

got all our gear on if we’re Sarah’s you

know the body armor the the weapons the

ammunition the backpacks all the stuff

that we carry is really quite heavy so

unless you need to be up mobile with

that stuff on you don’t if you can be

sitting then see if you can be sitting

you know sitting down on the ground or

lying down then do it so we we actively

make sure that we can rest our people

whenever we can so we don’t want to be

sitting around that adrenaline pump you

ready to go and nothing’s happening and

then it would exhausted ourselves by the

time we get to enemy contact and

actually in the firefight so taking that

to sort of you know rural organization

and for for businesses it’s about you

know resting your resources when you can

so that you’ve been got the full effort

and sometimes you need 110% effort at

certain times people can only give that

assert in a certain period of time you

can’t just keep being it’s 110 percent

so resting resting your resources when

you can sleep breath is a really

important thing breathing I found is so

important in that crisis moment the

decision-making and I’ve just been

working recently with a neuroscientist

one of the world leading neuroscientists

and he’s kind of unpacked a lot of my

experiences on the battlefield in in

particular in decision-making and looked

at the ways that we’re trained to make

decisions and one of the key components

that I wasn’t really aware of was the

importance of breathing were in there in

that crisis moment

because it oxygenates a brain and then

we can actually make a good decision the

right decision rather when we hold our

breath and tense up in those

environments so breath breath works

really important meditation is something

that I do and keeping physically well so

putting good energy into the body good

food good resources keeping fit keeping

active and also you know mental health

you know looking after yourself keeping

a positive mind frame so there’s just

kind of a spray of things in short

succession but yeah it could unpack all

of those for another half an hour but um

there kind of some tips happy for anyone

to jump in if you’ve got any other ideas

to help the group on a new thoughts then

yeah that’s very good advice

particularly the breathing component for

sure um another question that we’ve got

and I’m just and look at the time

because we’ve got five minutes left so

I’ll ask one more question and this then

jess is going to wrap up the session for

us so thank you all for joining us I

haven’t seen any additional questions

come into the chat box so I will just

finish with this question here which is

if I can go back true there is a risk

reward ratio in every decision

particularly in crisis situations what

steps do you take to ensure that this

ratio is balanced appropriately awesome

um yes risk and ratio and I guess look

if you look at every decision that we

make in life and in business there’s a

risk associated with everything so it’s

about accepting we can’t eliminate risk

and we don’t want to eliminate risk as a

broom that mindset where we want no risk

at all

and we won’t achieve anything and we

won’t be successful in what we try to do

so we need to shoot mindset to accept

risk but we want to minimize the risk

and maximize the reward and then and the

successful outcome so for me on the

battlefield

a lot of that has been focused on risk

mitigation trying to bring that risk and

obviously we have to accept there’s a

huge level of risk when you’re in a war

zone there is a very real component

you may be injured or killed and for me

as a as an officer as a leader my

biggest fear was not being injured or

killed in war zones it was my biggest

fear was that I would make a decision

that led to the injury or death a lot of

my team members one of my soldiers and

so in many ways that helped me remove

the emotion from myself so sometimes

being a leader is actually helpful in

these crisis situations because you can

focus on the mission and not worry about

your own your own physical health

because I’m so focused on the team

aspect um I’ve gotten where I was going

with that

but anyway so yeah it helps to focus on

their team help me hear back what was

the pilot question was a risk and reward

yeah just bounce yeah risk and award so

you know we want to try and minimize

that risk and during the Lebanon War we

found ourselves in a situation where you

know what unarmed all military from

different countries I was the only

Australian only woman in my entire

patrol regions both in Syria and Lebanon

for 13 months and so we’re you know

we’ve suddenly find ourselves from our

normal role of mission was to monitor a

peace agreement between these countries

and in literally in a split second we

went from monitoring a peace agreement

to being on the end of world war three

it’s like every asset of warfare coming

down on us fighter jets tanks attack

helicopters

you know the whole gamut was firing at

us around us and so initially it was

right the right response was for us to

stay on that battlefield in that

environment reporting violations of the

peace agreement and doing our job but

after a couple of days of all of these

you know we had so many near misses of

that basis so many times that myself and

my teammates should have died in that

first couple of days of the war it got

to a component or a level where that

risk and reward was completely out of

whack the the level of risk for us to

remain at that base continue monitoring

that war an environment that we weren’t

supposed to be in and we weren’t

supported to be in we didn’t have enough

defenses at the base

a literary the Hezbollah had a set of

bolt cutters they could have just cut

the padlock on the front gate and there

will be in the base and we had no

weapons to defend ourselves so and the

risk of even being bombed from some of

the Israeli assets outweigh the benefit

of us reporting thousands and thousands

more violations of the peace agreement

so in my mind we had gone from

monitoring a peace agreement to

monitoring a war and that actually

wasn’t part of our mission statement we

shouldn’t have been there after a couple

of days so we were pushing to actually

have the unarmed peace giving force

withdrawn from the war zone and

unfortunately that that decision wasn’t

made until the Chavez key arm had been

bombed and four of my teammates had lost

their lives so it’s a very extreme

example of where we get that risk and

reward when we get that wrong it can

lead to really catastrophic situations

and it’s about keeping an eye on we

don’t want to remove the risk that we

want to make sure we’ve got the balance

right in all the decisions that we’re

making yeah thank you that’s that’s a

great example to use and like you say

it’s probably not something that we all

have to ever you know experience in our

lifetimes that’s certainly very key

takeaways that we can apply in our own

lives handing over to you just by

mattina how you going I’m good yourself

thank you just on behalf of rural room

the corporate team and the media string

is that room we’d really like to thank

you for joining us this evening I had

the pleasure of our CEO you know talk at

this drain cotton conference back in

2018 and honestly I’ve still got a few

notes written down from that talk and so

I really resonated with me and so when I

to talk to think about you know speakers

that we’re going to have last year and

we had our team meeting immediately I

thought of you and then I was lucky

enough to get your book in December

which was this fantastic

so you posted that to me and I totally

recommend it anyone that wants to have a

really good read and just feel really

inspired and just really get some really

take-home messages like it’s just

amazing enough yeah just in awe of what

you do and just the the messages that

you put out that that’s just generally

on the day to day that you can just just

put it into you into your business so

yeah I’m really thankful they might

absolute pleasure in terms of the book

we’re offering a 25% discount using the

code rule room so I think we’ll be able

to share with you all how you go about

that just go to my website the code and

also a discount for the online program

but thank you so much all of you for

having me in your homes tonight

you’ve got something out of it and I’ve

really appreciated your time yeah thank

you so much matina and I’ll let everyone

it’s always the awkwardest thing is once

you’ve had such an amazing session is

like ejecting yourselves like

simultaneously so I’ll let everyone go

back to their lives and thank you so

much for yeah for joining us tonight

thank you thanks to the Lilith scribe

thank you bye-bye thanks very much guys

have a good evening

thanks again just thanks metate Oh

you

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